Shattuck/Page/Symons/Morris Ancestry & Quaker Ancestry

Sources:

Shattuck

"Sometimes it is written nearly in conformity
with the true orthography and pronunciation, as Shatac,
Shattauk, Shathooke, Shathauk, and Shatoc, Shattock, Shattocke.
At other times the pronunciation is varied by substituting
the sounds of d for t, and o for n, and is written Shadduck,
Shadock, Shadoc, and Chaddock, Chadduck, Chadock, Chadoc ...
It is also written Shaddic, Chadwick, Chadwyke, Chadioke,
Chadioc. Shattocke was the spelling in use when our first
American ancestors emigrated to this country..."
Lemuel Shattuck
Memorials of the Descendants of William Shattuck, p. 9

Shattuck

According to Philip Shaddock (researcher and Shattocke family historian), in his writing regarding the Massachussetts Shattucks, "two Shattocke immigrants to Massachusetts, William Shattock, who settled in Watertown, just outside of Boston, and Samuel Shattock, who settled in Salem, just to the north. His sources were Charles Henry Pope (The Pioneers of Massachusetts, Boston 1900) and Sidney Perley (The History of Salem, Salem 1924-28). (I am using the name "Shattock or Shattocke" as it was originally spelled when Shattockes first came to Massachusetts from England.)"

According to Massachussetts Shattucks - Shattocke Family History, an online article by Philip Shaddock, "the earliest Shattuck immigrants were Puritans, part of a mass exodus of Puritans from England." The Shattuck immigrants were "William and Samuel" according to Charles Edward Banks, an early 20th century researcher. William and Samuel were from an unknown parish in Somerset County. Samuel's birthdate is ca. 1620 and he was likely born in England, not the colony. His death is listed occuring in 1689. One of his daughters was Damaris. This makes one wonder if the "widow Damaris" was Samuel's mother and his daughter's namesake. Yet, that remains inconclusive.

Philip Shaddock mentions the following regarding William Shattuck (1621-1672), a Puritan, and theorized single founder of most Massachussetts Shattucks:

William Shattuck's name appears as Wm. Shattocke in the will of Thomas Olliver of Boston dated 13 March 1652. He apparently owed the estate money.

Lemuel in his Descendants book lists a third Shattuck, William Shattuck of Boston, who does not appear to be the patriarch of any other Shattuck in Lemuel's records. He lived in Boston between 1650 and 1658, before moving on to New Jersey to escape religious persecution.

More on William Shattuck of Boston is below in the tree.

According to research by Philip Shaddock, the Shattucks are descended from the Celtic Shattocke ancestral family with surname variants including Shattock, Shaddock, Shaddick, Shadwick, Shadduck, Chaddock and others with a common ancestor from around A.D. 1275. However, they are probably not descended from the Celt population found in Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Cornwall. Etymologists consistently classify the surname as Germanic, making the Shattockes Germanic Celts and the most likely scenario is that they came to England, specifically west Somerset, in the first quarter of the 14th century. In his study of the Somerset Shattockes, Philip Shaddock shows they do come from west Somerset, specifically the Taunton Deanne, about 130 square miles west of Taunton, Somerset, England. Kees Recourt has created a map showing where living descendants of Shattocke ancestors originated from (Switzerland) and where they dispersed to. Shattockes belong to the U152 subclade. The genetic evidence is that Shattockes are descended from the La Tène culture. Further back, they are descended from Indo-European speakers who invaded Western Europe. For more information, read the following (and do so in the order listed):

 
Pictures by Philip Shaddock from Somerset, England where Shattockes were


Origins of Massachusetts Shattucks


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Samuel
(or William and sometimes listed as John)
Shattuck
(Shattock/Shattocke errantly written as Shatluck on p. 718 in Along the Way... book)

b. ca. 1584
d. ca. 1641

I lean towards his name being Samuel after reading the work Philip Shaddock at Stogumber Shattocks and Shattucks in America as well as The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011).

His family may have emigrated to Salem, MA, on the Mary & John from Somerset, England. He either died in England or aboard the ship or shortly after arrival in Massachussetts. However, it is conjecture that he died on a ship sailing from England to New England, America, before 1642. This is mentioned at Gilbert Park Fay Family Genealogy in reference to William's father. It is also mentioned in reference to Samuel or William or John as death on the ship in 1637 being a possible alternative to death in Boston in 1641 at Geni. Yet, it is worth noting that Geni has many errors and must be used judiciously. The death at sea is speculated at the following as well: Genealogy.com Forum Re: Samuel SHATTUCK b 1594 Dorsetshire, England; died Essex Co, MA; RootsWeb, Needham Family Genealogy at KSU and others. These could just be and are likely repeated errors or speculations or actual occurrences not yet proven. And none of them specify an original source. Some of the sites mention writings of Lemuel Shattuck (see above), but Philip Shaddock, family researcher, indicates that Lemuel Shattuck says nothing regarding death at sea and agrees it's just conjecture. However, in spring 2016, Philip did indicate "A 'widow Damaris' is recorded as being admitted to the church in 1641. The colony records do not indicate that any of the original Shattuck settlers had a wife named Damaris. Damaris was apparently married to another unnamed Shattock who died on the trip over." Conjecture: Was she the mother of Samuel mentioned to the right?

"The Mary and John made two trips from Plymouth, England to Massachusetts Bay, one in 1630 and once in 1633-34. According to a book by Ann Natalie Hansen (The English Origins of the 'Mary and John' Passengers, Sign of the Cock, 1985), the passengers came from many towns in Dorset, Devon and Somerset. Charles Edward Banks, in The Planters of The Commonwealth in Massachusetts, 1620-1640, Boston, 1930 (p. 87), wrote: 'Mary and John, Thomas Chubb, Master. She sailed from Plymouth, England, March 20 [1630], with one hundred and forty passengers from the counties of Somerset, Dorset, and Devon.' The town that was established after the first voyage of 1630 was Dorchester, now an historic neighbourhood of Boston. Towns some of the passengers were from were Dorchester (Dorset), Bridgport (Somerset), Crewkerne (Somerset) and Exeter (Devon). According to Banks (The Winthrop Fleet of 1630. Boston, 1930) the settlers in Massachusetts were assembled and sponsored by Reverend John White, Vicar of Dorchester, England, in whose honor Dorchester, Massachusetts was named. It must have been a night before sailing of excitement and chill fear among the strangers who met in the coastal town of Plymouth in the south east of Devon, England" (source: Shattucks in America). Note that per that source, no Shattockes are on the passenger list for the Mary and John in 1630 and 1630-34, but the list is incomplete and has not been fully reconstructed. Philip Shaddock indicates that we do not find William and Samuel on the Mary and John passenger lists because they would have been 12 and 14 in 1633-34 and children were not usually listed as passengers.

Given the 1641 date for the widow Demaris (to the right) presenting herself at the church, Erica Isabel Howton, curator for Geni.com, does not favor her arrival as being during 1630-1634, but later. Philip Shaddock writes, "In the end it probably does not matter if the Shattockes who emigrated to the Massachusetts Bay colony were on the Mary and John. The fact is they appear to have been related to the Popes so they must have come from the same parish or nearby parish in England. They would almost certainly be from the 'West Country,' including Dorset, Devon and Somerset because that is where the Mary and John passengers came from. And those from Somerset were from Taunton or towns nearby, or a few miles north in Bridgport and its vicinity" (source: Shattucks in America).

Damarius (Damaris/Demaris)
"The Widow" of Salem

b. 1609 in England
d. 28 November 1674, Essex, Massachusetts

Philip Shaddock indicates "The 'widow' Damaris Shattock is recorded as being admitted to the church in 1641. She was either widowed back in England, on the trip over, or sometime between 1634 and 1641" (source: Shattucks in America). He leans to the latter, making Damaris the widow "a possible candidate" to be the mother of William and Samuel, again conjecture.

Others argue against this idea: According to https://www.geni.com/people/William-Shattuck-of-Watertown/6000000002603593786#/tab/overview, "William SHATTUCK - b. about 1622; d. Aug. 14, 1672, Watertown, Middlesex Co., MA. Buried at Arlington Street Cemetery, with gravesite having a memorial tablet [inscription] erected in 1853 by Lemuel SHATTUCK, a descendant. William, a weaver by trade, was at Watertown, Middlesex Co., MA by 1639, but his origins and arrival in America are based on speculation. Attempts to identify his mother as the widow Damaris SHATTUCK and his younger brother as Samuel SHATTUCK of Salem, MA are not supported by available evidence" (emphasis mine). In a discussion with Erica Isabel Howton, curator for Geni.com, she shares that there is no evidence supporting William of Watertown being a son of the widow and indicates it is only conjecture that William of Boston and NJ could be her son. Philip Shaddock writes, "In Lemuel's Descendants he assigns William Shattuck of Boston and Samuel Shattuck of Salem to the appendix because he is not sure how they are related to the other Shattucks. And there has been no documents that support or rule out making William of Watertown, Samuel of Salem and the widow Damaris of Salem a nuclear family. This shows why DNA testing may be the only way such issues will be resolved. I am not particularly married to any of the scenarios I have explored because I know that Y-DNA testing will sort things out in the end. What is really exciting about the DNA research right now is that it is indicating that the Watertown Shattucks and Salem Shaddocks are very, very closely related. The only caveat at this point is that the South Carolina Shaddocks, who are proven by DNA analysis to descend from a common ancestor Massachusetts Shattockes, and are in fact very close relatives with one particular branch, are not proven beyond doubt to be descendants of the Salem Shaddocks. So I cannot be sure we are testing Salem Shaddocks, even though recent research as indicated the probable migration to South Carolina of Shaddocks was from Salem and Boston, not Watertown. We have a number of DNA tests going right now with Shattucks from other branches of Massachusetts Shattockes, so I am hoping clarity will be brought to the situation in the next few months [as of May 2016]" (source: Shattucks in America, emphases mine).

At times, this Damarius is listed as "Damarius Hopkins" and appears in genealogies around the Shattucks. Even Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 24, mentions "Damaris Hopkins, born in England, d. 28 Nov 1674, at Salem, MA. Damaris Hopkins married Wm or Samuel Shattuck; he later died on a ship on the way to New England before 1642. Damaris Hopkins' father was Stephen Hopkins by his second marriage to Elizabeth Fisher. ... [A]fter her husband's death, married Captain Thomas Gardner in 1639, possibly on the ship at sea. They lived in Boston or Salem, MA. Damaris Gardner died in Salem, MA., 28 Nov 1674, aged 70 years." However, it is speculated that Hopkins is an attempt to connect her to the Mayflower. Lemuel Shattuck's book on page 114 discusses Robert Shattuck's wife Ruhamah Cook (m. in Plymouth, MA, 9 September 1744). She is indicated as probably being a descendant of Francis Cooke who died in Plymouth 17 April 1663, one of the original Mayflower Pilgrims. Francis married a woman from southern Belgium bordering on France -- "a French lady" named Hester. Among their children was Jacob Cooke who is said to have married Demaris Hopkins, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, in 1646. This would indicate that a Damaris with the maiden name Hopkins may not be in this part of my ancestry. Some sources mention that Samuel (or William or John) Shattuck had a wife named Damaris who, after his death, married Thomas Gardner (his 3rd wife). The Demaris here is likely "the widow" of Salem, but there is no evidence supporting that her maiden name was Hopkins. According to page 152 of The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011), Damaris Shattuck, a widow, showed up in Salem in 1641 and subsequently married Capt. Thomas Gardner, a tavern owner. It gives Damaris Shattuck Gardner's death date as 28 November 1674.

     

A critical eye on Damaris UNK ( ? - 1674), m1 UNK Shattuck, m2 Thomas Gardner

A Shattuck migration from Salem and Boston through North Carolina to South Carolina over 20 or 30 years to 1702 might be the most plausible theory according to Philip Shaddock.   |
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This Damaris "had to be a daughter of widow Damaris as she was too old in 1653 to be a daughter of William or Samuel" - referring not to the above man, but to one of the two immigrants (Samuel and William) who were born in the 1620s (source: Shattucks in America). This is supported on page 153 of The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011).

Damaris (Demaris/Damarius) Shattuck They were Quakers who escaped persecution by their Puritan neighbors in the Massachusetts Bay colony. Issac Page
(Isack Page)
Pamela Kudla posted the following: I've tried to research the reason why and when Isack and Damaris had left Salem. We kind of already know why they left. I've narrowed it down to sometime in 1659 which is is a date that seems to be recurring throughout Salem history at that time for Quaker evacuation of Salem. I don't have anything after 1659 in Massachusetts. Till they showed up in North Carolina, I have no idea where they were at. I have found Isack's will in early Pasquotank or Perquimans County in Quaker records. There was a reference to it made by Hinshaw in the introductions to either one of these meetings in his book. The original will is on Ancestry and the old English writing is very difficult to read but it is out there with his name spelled as Isack. Isack was a bricklayer and there is a Abraham Page in Boston who is also a bricklayer. I found reference to an Abraham Page in England who was also bricklayer who had sons by the name of Abraham, Isack and Jacob who is at the right time period to be my Isack's father. (My Isack's name is also spelled as "Isack" in Abraham's will) There are few headrights in North Carolina that list Isack and his family and from what I can conclude there were known children by the name of Damaris, Elizabeth, Mary, and possibly John. I've primarily focused on my research starting in Salem. ...I'm fairly certain that he spelled his name as "Isack."
  b. ca. 1630
Dorset, England
d. 4 July 1680, Perquimans, North Carolina

On page 718 of Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, it mentions she was born ca. 1634 in England and died in MS or NC. The dates from that source for the marriage and Isack's death are consistent with what is depicted.

m. 30 September 1653 in Boston

"Damaris Shattuck, daughter of the widow of the same name, married a man named Isaac Page in Boston on 30 September 1653, recorded in the original record as 'Isaac Pag was marryed to Damaris Shattock 30 : 7 : 53 pr Mr William Hibbins.' William Hibbins was the official who married the couple. The month of '7' was not July, but September under the old-style Julian calender (remember Latin 'sept' is seven)." Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011), p. 154.

Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 24, states as follows: "The New England Historical and Genealogical Register Vol. X, July 1856, No. 3... states on page 224, that Isaac Page was married to Damaris Shattuck 30th of 7 mo, 1653, by William Hibbins. This marriage appears not to be Quaker, but Puritan in character. Issac Page and his family left Massachusetts for North Carolina sometime before 1663-1664. It was a three month journey from Boston to North Carolina by land, and a much shorter trip by boat. His occupation was not known. From Colonial Records of North Carolina, Vol. 1 1662-1712, published in 1886 by the State of North Carolina: Issac Page was one of the known signers of a Quaker petition on the 13th day of March 1679, along with others who stood single from the seditious actions which happened within the county of Albemarle in the year 1677, and asked that his Majesty put an end to such practices. At the end of the petition were these words. 'Understand that the above names are here-to subscribed and have been inhabitants in Carolina since the year 1663-1664.'"

b. ca. 1630
Boston, MA
d. 4 May 1680
Pasquotank Co., NC, USA
Issac Page was from Great Baddom, England. He was a Quaker who left Boston, Massachussetts, with his family for North Carolina between 1663 and 1664 and established residence with his daughters Damarius and Elizabeth. Philip Shaddock indicates "Isaac Page and his wife Damaris, persecuted in Boston, moved to a community of Quakers in North Carolina in a settlement called Little Rivers in Perquimans county. There are other Shattucks or Shattocks or Shaddocks in Pasquotank county 20 miles by road north of Perquimans county" (source: Carolina Shattucks). Issac and Damaris Page's migration from Massachusetts to North Carolina to flee persecution is mentioned on page 154 in The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011).
The North Carolina Quaker records, Symons Creek Monthly Meeting, Vol. 1, 1678, page 4 located at Friends Historical collection, Guilford College Library, Greensboro, NC, has the following about Issac Page: 'Isahc Page 1680' our friend, Isahc Page departed this life the 4 da of the month in the yere of our accounts being a faithful testimony for the truth till his death.' Also the will of Issac Page the last day of fourth month 1680; Friend Charles Prouse and Henry White to be Exsekitor. Mentions 'my daughter Damaris, my daughter Elizabeth and the Church.'

William Perry Johnson in his 'Three Early North Carolina Wills,' published in North Carolina Genealogy XVII, (Spring and Summer 1921) 2615-2616:Will of Isaac Page, 'I leave my Exsekitorship of Robert Lourris estate unto Charles Prouse; witness Dorothy Prouse, Elizabeth Page. Signed Isack Page.'

The will of Isack Page has never fully been documented, but is said to mention his daughter Damaris and her children; his daughter Elizabeth, and provides for her if she marries Samuel Hill. It is also said that part of the will is as follows, 'all worldly goods both reall and personall, to my wife and children to be equally divided and as they come of age 21, children to remain with wife as she remains unmarried.' At present time this compiler has no knowledge as to whether Issac Page's wife remarried, nor of her death date.

The above reference of Isack Page to his daughter Damaris and her children raises a question. Was there more than one child (John Morris, b. 1680)? John Morris was born 31 March 1680. Issac Page's will was written the 4th day of the 4th month, 1680, so grandchild John Morris is known to him. Did his daughter Damaris (Page) Morrison Morris have more than one child?" (Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, pp. 24-25).
             
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Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 24, states the following: "The ancestry of Issac Page of Great Baddom, Essex, England, is not known. On 30 July 1565 or 1653, he married Damaris Shattuck, Boston, Massachusetts. He died 4 May 1680, Albemarle, Pasquotank, North Carolina. Two known children were born to this marriage. One was Damaris Page, b. 1659, d. 12 Sept 1722, md. John Morris in 1678. The other was Elizabeth Page, b. 1663, d. 4 Oct 1726." Per Gwen Gransberg and her research: William Symons may have first settled in Massachusetts around Lynn, Essex County. William was also one of the first families to settle East Hampton, Suffolk County, New York. Many court records have been found regarding William and his sons, buying land, selling land, and some very intriguing personal records as well. The Symons lived at a very lively and exciting time for America, as they were some of the first settlers of this New World. The Symons family were devout Quakers. However, the Quakers split over slavery. Some went north, such as to Michigan. Others in the family stayed in the south with their slaves, and clung to slavery. The Symons family was part of the Quaker community in Pequimons Co. and Pasquotank Co., North Carolina.

Morris

Edward Morris
b. mid-1500s?
m. Martha
d. ?
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John Morris, Sr., Kt.
b. late 1500s?
m. Mary
d. ?
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John Morris, Jr.
b. 1609, Wales
m. Hannah
d. 1654
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?
?
John Morris II
(II is speculative in the case of his father not being John)

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Morris Origins?

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Morris Origins? Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris lists various origins:"The Morris name, which is of great antiquity and known under various orthnographics, is composed of the Welsh words 'Maur Rhys' and anglicized to Maur Ryce, meaning 'warlike, powerful in war,' or aggressive. It is originally believed to have migrated from North Africa to Wales and was brought in by Moorish tribes that invaded England and Wales.

The Anglo-Saxon invasion of England resulted in the establishing the family name 'Marritius' for Mau-Rhys, a Welsh appelation for Rhys or Rhis. This Morris name has evidently had more than one center of origin. Its principal home is in the counties bordering Wales (excluding Clveshire), namely Shopshire, Herefordshire, Monmouthshire and afterwards in Welsh counties themselves. Hence it has spread over most of the midland counties. Morris when found in Wales and adjoining English counties, is derived from Mars the God of War (Welsh form of Mawrrwyce). One, 'Maur Fitzgeareld,' was a Cambrian chieftan who was a successful invader of Ireland in the reign of Henry the Second. The king, having called on the 'Maur Rhice' for help in Ireland, gave him in compensation a large domain in Wales where the family flourished for many generations. They gradually dropped the Fitzgeareld and adopted the 'Maur (or great) Rhice.' In the 17th century, the descendants of the great 'Rhys' were still a considerable people in Monmoutshire and were called Maurice, or sometimes Moorice. Morris families were residents at an early time in the early 13th century in Wales and England, and were for the most part of landed classes and yeomandry.

In addition to Fritz-Morris, there were other clan names such as Mount, De and Dan Morris. These were gradually dropped. The more various spellings of the Morris name have been: Maurcie, Mauris, Mawrryce, Morice, Morres, Morrice, Moorise, Morris, Mourise, Morys, Morus and Morces. "Various crests and mottos have been used by different Morris families. One of these is 'Prompricum Daus et Patriumm,' meaning 'and the God of our Fathers.' Morris was the name of an extensive and powerful family in colonial North America who played a leading part in the emergence of the nation. They were descended from Richard Morris (d. 1672), who had fought in Oliver Cromwell's army in England. When Cromwell was defeated five to six years later, Richard fled to Barbados as a Quaker and became a merchant. Then, a few years later, he went to the New England area and he took up land and either Richard or his son, Lewis (1671-1746), established the 'Manor of MORRISANIA' in New York State. Richard's grandson, Lewis (1726-1798), was the third owner of the Manor. He was also a signer of the Declaration of Independence. ... Some family traditions say that the Morris family were Quakers before coming to America in the 1600s" (pp. 18-19).

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"Three brothers came from Wales in the early settlings of the country two settle in the Eastern states and the one we descended from settled in eastern North Carolina." (pp. 18-19).

Two traditions have been recorded and passed down about the entry of this Morris family to America, which involve a John Morris and two brothers coming from Wales. The first tradition is an assertion by Oliver Morton Morris of Long Beach, California in his September 1940, book on 'Morris Family Tree' on page 9, section II that: 'the first entry of record of Morriss in America was in the year 1660 when John Morris and his two brothers Caleb and Phineas, emigrated from Wales to North Carolina and settled in the counties of Pasquotank and Perquimans in Northeast North Carolina where there was a settlement of Society of Friends, commonly called Quaker Friend, as the three brothers belonged to the Society of Friends in Wales. John was the father of John Morris born 3 March 1680. The offspring of this John Morris mentioned above and the branches of Caleb and Phineas Morris, his two brothers, removed to many parts of the United States.' As a compiler of this genealogy, I have not been able to turn up any additional information on Caleb and Phineas Morris. The second tradition about the North Carolina family of John Morris comes out of the Reuben Morris family. A son, Joseph E. Morris, at age 84, a Quaker, who was born in North Carlina, old Rowan County, on the 22 da 9 mo 1813, in a letter dated March 24, 1897, from Indianapolis, IN, stated in part the following: 'The history as far as I know is as follows. Three brothers came from Wales in the early settlings of the country two settle in the Eastern states and the one we descend from settled in eastern North Carolina.'"(pp. 32-33)

Note: The Morris ancestry prior to John II (if he was a II), husband of Damarius Page, is speculative as sources are lacking.

Morris Origins? Another possible Morris origin according to My Friends the Lambs by Billie Lee Smith, speculates the following: "The Morris family is of direct Welsh descent. The name is variously spelled, and is composed of the Welsh words 'Mawy-rwyce,' meaning strong or brave in battle.

The family claims descent from Eliptan Godrydd, a powerful British chieftain, who founded the fourth royal tribe of Wales, born in 933. From him and others of his descendants sprang the noble houses of Gadogan, the Pryces of Newton Barons, as well as families of Morice of Werrington, Morrice of Eetshanger, Morris of the Hurst, and others.

The earliest arrivals in Virginia, of those bearing the name, as yet found, listed in John Camden Hotten's original Lists of those who went from Great Britain to the Virgian Plantations from 1600-1700. Although this is not complete, it is supposed to contain all extant known records. In this we find the following:

'From the muster of the inhabitants of the college lands in Virginia, Elizabeth Cittie, Capt. William Tucker, Master John Morris, age 24, in the ship Bona Nova, November 1619.'

'Living in Elizabeth Cittie, Va. 16 February 1623, John Morris'"

Morris Origins? The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011), p. 332, tells us that John Morris - who did marry Damaris Page - has uncertain origins. Some speculate that he may have been a Morrison. Others suppose he arrived at Jamestown, VA, in 1619 aboard the Bona Neuva. Still others presume he was from Massachussetts. However, Hunt (mentioned previously) mentions a researcher who "leans to the conclusion that a 26-year-old John Morris, who sailed from London to Virginia on the ship David in 1635 is more likely to have been the family progenitor.... All we can state with confidence is that the name was common among early immigrants to America, and we simply do not know John Morris' ancestry or origins.

Morris Origins? WikiTree indicates the father of John Morris (1652-1680; m. Damaris Page) was Charles Morris (b. ca. 1625, Jamestown, Virginia, m. Hannah, d. 1679, Pasquotank, North Carolina) and has him the brother of John Morris (who allegedly was father to John Morris II, father of John Morris III). This has some parallel with the tree back to Edward Morris but alleges several generations further back (: Charles Morris, son of John Morris, Sr. (b. 1600 in Llanedy, Carmathen, Wales, m. Elizabeth, d. before 1690, Albemarle, Virginia), son of Edward Morris (b. 1580, Wales, m. Martha Mattom, d. 14 August 1607, Jamestown, Virginia, one of the original settlers of Jamestown who listed as Gentleman, Corporal Edward Morish), son of Capt. Charles William Morris (b. ca. 1555, Wales, m. 1573 to Elizabeth Hollowell, d. ca. 1608, England), son of Anthony Morris (b. 1530 in Glamorgan, Monmouthshire, Wales, m. Elizabeth in 1549, d. before 8 May 1621 in Sussex, England), son of Thomas Morris (b. 1481, Coxwell, Berkshire, England, m. Alice Wynninge -- daughter of Robert Wynninge -- in 1506 in Berkshire, England, d. 1556 in Coxwell, Berkshire, England), son of Thomas Morris (b. 1455, England, d. July 1556, Ashley, Shropshire, England), son of Anthony Morris (b. ca. 1435, Monmouthshire, Wales, d. ca. 1487, Coxwell, Berkshire, England), son of John Morres (b. 1415, m. Alice Birmingham, d. 1460). Most of the sources (for those profiles that are sourced) are from user-entered Ancestry trees and Wikipedia and thus are not very reliable.

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Damaris (Damarius) Page
 
William Symons

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The Migration
of
William and Mary Symons

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William and Mary Symons, thought to live in Lynn, Massachusetts, prior to moving by 1651 to East Hampton in New York Colony, were the parents of Thomas and Jeremiah Symons, members of the Pasquotank monthly meeting in North Carolina. East Hampton's town records indicate that Goodwife Simons was a witness in the 1657 case of Joshua Garlick's wife who was accused of witchcraft. Testimony given sugggests that "Goody" Simons was guilty of using home remedies provided by "Goody" Garlick, not only for herself but to cure the afflictions of others.

A power-of-attorney was executed by William Symons and his son, Thomas, in 1664 in Isle of Wight in New York Colony (now Gardiner's Island, Suffolk County, L.I. New York), to Jeremiah Conkling of Easthampton to sell his 12 acres of land. It was probably about this time that William Symons removed with his family to Carteret Precinct, Albemarle County (now Pasquotank County), NC. In a letter dated Oct. 1684, to David Gardner, Isle of Wight in New York Colony, signed by Thomas Symons of Little River in Albermarle Co, NC "ye son of William Symons, deceased", Thomas requested that his land at East Hampton be sold (the two six-acre plots which his father had authorized Jeremiah Conkling to sell in 1664). In a postscript he asked to be remembered "to my Uncle Fifthian and other kindred". Again in August or October 1685, Thomas Symons writes to David Gardner authorizing the sale of his land at East Hampton, and reports "my father and mother are both dead". A deed recorded in February, 1685 shows that David Gardiner of Isle of Wight sold for the sume of 14 current money of Boston, the above named property to Jeremiah Conkling, Jr. It is probable that Jeremiah Conkling was related to the Symons family (perhaps the father or brother of Thomas Symons' mother, Mary although this cannot be confirmed).

Source: Charles Stanley via rootsweb. It is worth noting that there are errors from some of the posts in that thread.


Mary [surname possibly Fithian or Gardiner]

Amy Hedrick (9th great granddaughter of William and Mary Symons → Thomas Symons → Peter Symons → Jehosaphat Symons → Jesse Symons → Nathan Symons → Sarah Symons (1813-1872) who married William Allen, Sr. → William Allen, Jr., → Florence (Allen) Hedrick → Amy Hedrick's father → Amy Hedrick; she is my 10th cousin) indicates that "Goody" is not a nickname for Mary, that Quakers used Goody like we use Mrs.; e.g., Goody Symons instead of Mrs. Mary Symons. This is substantiated on page 2070 of North Carolina Genealogy, Volumes 13-14 by William Perry Johnson (1967). Some sources have Rebecca White, Mary Conkling, Alice Robbins, Mary Alice Robbins Conkling, but I have put the most conclusive entry based on the research of Gwen Gransberg (9th great granddaughter of William and Mary "Goody" Symons → Jeremiah Symons → Tamar Symons Bundy → Jeremiah Bundy → Moses Bundy → Miriam Bundy Brown (wife of John Brown) → Sarah Brown Monroe (Gwen's great-great-great grandmother) → Gwen's great-great grandparent → Gwen's great grandparent → Gwen's grandparent → Gwen's parent → Gwen Gransberg; she is my 10th cousin).

Document: Symons, White, Morris family confusion spelled out from the research of Amy Hedrick.

Amy cites these sources: Cyndi's List: Quaker >> Records: Meetings & Miscellaneous, U.S., Hinshaw Index to Select Quaker Records (1680-1940) and Research Guide to finding your Quaker Ancestors.

b. 3 March 1652, Virginia Colony
d. 30 June 1680, Perquimans Co., NC
(source: Geni.com, details somewhat speculative)
m. 1678, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
(source: Geni.com, details somewhat speculative)
b. 1659
baptized in North Carolina in 1659, same day as sister Elizabeth (source: Carolina Shattucks)
d. 12 September 1722
Damaris Page was also Damaris White as she married Henry White in 1681 as her first husband died in 1680. Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 24, states the following: "Damaris Page, b. 1659, d. 12 Sept 1722, md. John Morris in 1678. ... One researcher says that Damaris Page first married M.R. Morrison before 1678, then married John Morris in 1678, and later Henry White, Jr., 10 Sept 1681, according to Quaker records. It is presumed that the John Morris, b. 3 March 1680, is the son of the previously mentioned John Morris." On page 718, the source states, "Damaris Page md. 1st John Morris (son) md. 2nd Henry (2) White 10 July 1681." b. ca. 1620
Buckinghamshire or Suffolk, England
d. ca. 1684
Pasquotank Co., NC
m. 18 January 1643
in Woburn, Middlesex Co.,
Massachusetts.
b.
d.
             
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According to My Friends the Lambs by Billie Lee Smith, Charles Morris may have been the father of John Morris below. That source has Charles born ca. 1652 and married a woman named Hannah and him being present at Quaker meeting 24, 4th month, 1679. He died mid-to-late-1679 in Virginia. This is an error as according to WikiTree, Charles Morris was born in 1625, was married to Hannah and was father of the above John Morris. This, if it is true, is the more plausible scenario since most sources support that John and Damaris (Page) Morris were the parents of the below John Morris, and this is supported by my DNA connection to the Shattuck ancestry. |
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    Source for Thomas and Rebecca Symons: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011), pp. 328-330. Thomas Symons, Sr.
b. ca. 1648-1649
m. before 24 June 1679 to Rebecca (maiden name unconfirmed, unlikely White).

They lived at Little River, Pascotank, North Carolina
Thomas died 18 April 1706 and Rebecca died 25 April 1718.

Will of Thomas Symons

 
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"The male parentage of John Morris, b. 3 March 1680, and the son of Damaris Page Morrison, Morris, is not known and is the subject of much speculation by researchers. The Pasquotank Monthly Meeting Quaker records, starting in 1699, state only that John Morris marries Mary Symons, 4 Sept 1703. Nowhere is there a statement as to who his father is. Such Quaker records, if they existed, have been lost. However, the names of John, Charles and William do appear in the Quaker records for this time period. The civil records prior to 1700 record in Albemarle County, which contained Pasquotank, Perquimans and Chowan precincts: a John Morris on 20 March 1680; a Thomas Morris on Dec 1681, and Oct 1686; and a William Morris on Dec 1681, and April 1685" (Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 34) |
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  John Morris III
(III is speculative in the case of his father not being II)
  Mary Symons  
John Morris (1680-1739) was an elder among the Quakers. "[F]rom Sarah P. Morrison's "Out of North Carolina," John Morris (b. 1680) "has been describe as 'he being as elder of our meetings pretty well accounted for' Oh that is a matter-indeed for Praise." It appears that John Morris, the Quaker, was not a slave holder according to record" (Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 34). b. 31 March 1680
d. 20 September 1739

Dates above and date for marriage are according to Hinshaw's American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. I, as mentioned on pp. 718-719 of Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris.

m. 4 September 1703

"...Men's Quaker records of 1699 which records John Morris's marriage to Mary Symons on 4 Sept 1703. Other Quaker records establish that he was born in 1680 and died in 1739, and that Mary Symons was born 4th, 1687, and d. 14 Aug 1745. Nowhere in the Quaker records is there a statement of who was John Morris's father. Mary Symons was the daughter of Thomas (2) Symons, who was born in Isle of Wight County, VA, and d. Feb 1706, in Pasquotank County, NC." (Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 25).

b. 4 February 1687/88
d. 14 August 1745

According to Hinshaw's American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. I, as mentioned on pp. 718-719 of Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, Mary was b. 14 Dec. 1687 d. 14 Aug. 1745 and provides the following:
(Mary was daughter of Thomas (2) Symons b. ca 1648 Isle of Wight d. 18 Feb. 1702 Pasquot??? and Rebecca White b. ca 1654 d. 25 Feb. 1718)
(Thomas (2) Symons was son of Thomas (1) Symons b. 1607 England md. Alice Robbins b. ca. 1611 England)
(Rebecca White was daughter of Henry (1) White md. (1) Rebecca (2) Eleanor)

 
 

Page 256 of Abstract of North Carolina Wills compliled by J. Bryan Grimes, 1910, states the following about this John Morris:

Morris, John Pasquotank County.
November 18, 1739. January Court 1739. Sons: Joseph and John (“my manner plantation”), Zachariah, Isac, Aaron, Joseph. Daughters: Hannah and Sarah Morris. Wife and Executrix: Mary. Witnesses: John Belman, Mary Albertson, Joseph Robinson. Clerk of the Court: James Craven.

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Children of "John Morris (b. 3-3-1680) & Mary Symons:
Aaron (b. 7-14-1704)
Elizabeth (b. 9-6-1707)
Joseph (b. 12-4-1709)
Sarah (b. 9-6-1712)
John (b. 12-31-1716)
...
Mary (b. 12-29-1719)
Zachariah (b. 9-23-1722)
Hannah (b. 11-23-1726)"
(Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 630)
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"No deed for land in Pasquotank, Perquimans, or Chowen counties has been found for any Morris prior to 1704. No land grant anywhere in North Carolina has been found before the 1740s for any known member of the John Morris family" (Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 46). Aaron Morris, Sr.
He is a "Sr." according to Geni.com
 
Mary Sarah Pritchard
Mary's parents were Benjamin and Sarah (Culpepper/Culpeper) Pritchard (Prechet)
  b. 14 September 1704
Pasquotank Co., NC

Page 719 of Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris has him b. 14 July 1704.

d. 10 September 1770
Will
m. 20 August 1724
Pasquotank Co., NC

Page 719 of Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris has them md. 6 mo. 1724.

b. 28 September 1707
Pasquotank Co., NC
d. 10 December 1791
Pasquotank Co., NC

Page 719 of Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris has her b. 1706 d. 12 Oct. 1791

   
           
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Mary Newby

(daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Newby)

print

Children of Joseph Morris, b. 2 Jan, 1731, d. 24 Nov, 1798

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1st marriage, Mary Newby

Miriam b. 28 March 1756, md. 26 Sept 1782, to John Cox
Benjamin, b. 10 May 1757, md. 1786, to Sarah ?
John, b. 28 July 1759
Mary, b. 29 March 1761, md. 19 May 1779, to William Overman
Joseph, b. 21 March 1763, d. 22 July 1819, md. 3 March 1790, to Sarah Sanders

2nd marriage, Hannah Overman

Elizabeth, b. 19 July 1765, md. 16 July 1783, to Job Brothers
Thomas, b. 15 Nov 1766, md. 12 Nov 1794, to Lucretia Henley

3rd marriage, Elizabeth

Joshua, b. 24 May 1769
Sarah, b. 6 Sept 1770, md. 21 Apr 1792, to Mr. Ooerman
Susannah, b. 27 Feb 1772
William, b. 7 Nov 1773, d. 27 Aug 1775
Clarkey, b. 1 Aug 1775
William, b. 15 Sept 1777, d. 3 Sept 1778
Nathan, b. 11 July 1779
Ann, b. 18 July 1782
Penelope, b. 3 Jan 1785
Millicent, b. 16 Aug 1787

An early practice sometimes used was that if a male child died in infancy a later born child was named the same.
(Source: p. 41, Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris)
Joseph Morris According to p. 387 of History of Perquimans County by Ellen Goode Rawlings Winslow (1931), Joseph Morris, son of Aaron, married Mary Newby

Source for dates for Mary Newby Morris and her marriage: p. 394 of the book History of Perquimans County by Ellen Goode Rawlings Winslow

b. 28 July 1732, Pasquotank, North Carolina
d. 9 July 1763 (9, 5th month of Julian Calendar, 1763), Perquimans, North Carolina
m. June 1755
(Along the Way..., p. 719, mentions md. 1 May 1755)
b. 1 April 1731
(Along the Way... mentions 1 January or 1 February 1731, p. 719 the latter)
d. 24 November 1798
(Along the Way..., p. 719, mentions d. 10 Sept. 1770)
Will and Estate
Joseph married Hannah Overman in 1764, the year after Mary's death. Joseph and Hannah had 2 children: Elizabeth and Thomas. Hannah died 12 days after Thomas was born according to Lew Griffin's research (Problems viewing?) based on Hinshaw's research in American Quaker Genealogy. Along the Way..., p. 719, mentions two subsequent marriages after Mary Newby: md. 2nd 2 Oct. 1764 to Hannah Overman and md. 3rd to Elizabeth.
             
"Davidson was formed in 1822 from Rowan. It is in the central section of the State and is bounded by Randolph, Montgomery, Rowan, Davie, Forsyth, and Guilford counties. Acts to amend the act establishing Davidson County were passed in 1822 and 1835, setting the boundary line between Davidson and Rowan. An act to empower the commissioners of Randolph and Davidson to establish the dividing line was passed in 1871. A part of Davidson was annexed to Forsyth County in 1889 and again in 1921." (Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 59). |
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  Life in 18th Century North Carolina prior to the Revolutionary War
  Benjamin Morris, Sr.   Sarah Elizabeth Bolton    
"Benjamin was 29 years of age when he md. in 1786. Sarah was 27, and in that day she was considered a spinster. Benjamin died at age 51 years, and she died past her 91st birthday in 1850." (p. 52, Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris) b. 10 May 1757
in Pasquotank Co., NC
d. 25 July 1808
in Davidson Co., NC
(Above dates per Along the Way..., p. 719)

Will
m. 1786 b. ca. 1759-1763
in Robeson, NC
d. ca. 1850
DeKalb, GA
Sarah was from North Carolina  
"[Benjamin and Sarah Morris] moved in 1788-1790 to the Randolph, Davidson County area to again cut down trees, clear small tracts of land for farming purposes, and build homes. Here the climate was cooler [than Pasquotank County], the land rolling and hilly and the soil poorer. Here Benjamin and Sarah Morris raised 6 sons and two daughters as listed in his 1808 will. Three sons and one daughter left that area to establish homes in the newly opened up lands west of the Appalachian Mountains between 1815 and 1835. One son moved to Georgia in 1825. One son stayed in Davidson County, NC, another died unmarried in Davidson County in 1828, and one daughter is unaccounted for, after 1812." (Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. II)

More about Benjamin and Sarah Morris

"Benjamin Morris, a 4th generation member of the John Morris, b. 1680, and Mary Newby family, opted, after the close of the Revolutionary War with his marriage to Sarah ? , to leave Pasquotank County and the Albemarle Sound area for the North Carolina interior, in what is known as the Piedmont Plateau lying along the east side of the Alleghany Mountains. He intended to do what his great-grandfather John Morris had done on the Albemarle Sound: clear tall forest trees and stumps from the land to develop farm land. ... We know that Benjamin Morris and his wife, Sarah, were still in Pasquotank County, NC, in 1786, where he is described as a planter, in Pasquotank County in an exchange of land with Joseph Pool. Two years later, he is found in the Rowan County, NC, 1790, Census with a wife and two male children under 16 years of age. They had married prior to 15 Feb, 1786 according to his dismissal from the Quaker Church." (Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, pp. 49-50).

"Benjamin Morris was the first son of John Morris and Mary Newby, his first wife, and was born in Pasquotank County, NC, on 10 May 1757, and died, according to Back Creek Monthly Meeting, NC, record, on 25 July 1808, in Davidson County, NC. No record has been found as to where he was buried. His place of residence was some 10 miles from the Quaker Back Creek Meeting house and cemetery, which contains a large number of unmarked burial spots. It is still not known how our Benjamin Morris, b. 10 May 1757, d. 25 July 1808, who was 18 in 1775, was involved in the Revolutionary War. A 1972 search was nil of the Revolutionary War records in the Library of Congress. In the North Carolina State Revolutionary War records, in Vol. 22, page 249, however, there is shown in 1775, an exact Muster Roll for Pasquotank County, NC, commanded by Colonel Robert Murden and in Captain Ben Palmer's Fifth Company 'beginning at the mouth of the Pasquotank on the southwest of ye same up as far as Newbegwen Creek containing 62 men - together with six Quakers, Joseph Scott, Samuel Scott, William Bundy, James Davis, John Eueiagin, and Ben Morris." There was no record that they received payment for their services. And the nature of their service was not stated. They may have been woodcutters, livestock herders, wagon drivers or supply foragers. These names did not appear in the patriot list of the Daughters of the American Revolution or Sons of the American Revolution.
Mutie June Clark in her book, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 1732-1774, published in 1986, by Genealogical Publishing Co., also lists on page 1075 the above six Quakers under Captain Palmer. She also lists under Lieutenant Colonel Murden two regiments from Perquimans County, NC, with 73 Quakers in one company, 42 Quakers in another company and 35 Quakers in another company. In addition to the six Quakers in Capt. Ben Palmer's company of Col. Robert Murden's Pasquotank Regiment, there was another Pasquotank Company that had 41 Quakers and another with 13 Quakers. All of these named persons show in Quaker membership records. In total, some 211 Quakers are listed as involved in some way in the Revolutionary War effort in NC.
Benjamin Morris would have been 18 years of age in 1775. Also, there were other Benjamin Morrises in the Pasquotank-Perquimans area at this time who could be cousins and somewhat in the same age bracket. This is a matter I have not fully explored.
Hinshaw, in his Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, records the following on Benjamin Morris b. 10 May 1757, d. 25 July 1808: Vol. I, pt. page 149, under Morris in Pasquotank records:
1786-2-15. Benjamin Jr: dis. MCD disowned-married contrary to discipline.
1792-2-19. Benjamin Morris: Con. MCD, was reinstated on recommendation of Back Creek Monthly Meeting. Some-how removed. Center M M order notified 1792-5-19. Benjamin Morris G.C.T., granted certificate to Back Creek Monthly
Meeting (one had been granted to Center Monthly Meeting 1792-2-5 which was never received). Back Creek had been set up since.

...
The Pasquotank Monthly Meeting shed little light on when Benjamin Morris married or to whom. She was not a Quaker .... Her given name first appears in a land transaction of her husband and her father-in-law on 23 Aug 1786, as Sarah, and she is named in the 1808 will of her husband Benjamin Morris as his 'beloved wife Sarah.' She is known as 'Sally' in the will of her second husband, Jonathan Mills, Sr. She probably was a Methodist, as her children show up as Methodist in Davidson County, NC, records.
...
Benjamin was 29 years of age when he md. in 1786. Sarah was 27, and in that day she was considered a spinster. Benjamin died at age 51 years, and she died past her 91st birthday in 1850. Her burial place is not known, but believed to be in DeKalb County, GA, where her son Enoch Morris had gone in search of new land. Sarah may be buried next to Enoch's wife, Mary." (Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, pp. 51-52)
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Descendants through son William Nelson Morris via his marriage to Sarah "Sallie" Hicks

Children of Benjamin and Sarah Morris

(Source: Along the way with Benjamin Morris, (1757-1808) and his wife, Sarah, of North Carolina: his forebearers and descendants from before 1680 to 1996 by Lewis Ecroyd Morris, p. 64):

Benjamin Morris
b. 10 May 1757, d. 25 July 1808
and
Sarah ?


Their Children:
...................................................................................
Reuben Morris
b. 18 Nov 1786, d. 4 Jan 1864, md. 24 Jan 1807, to Miriam Copeland, b. 19 June 1786
...............................................................................................
Simeon
b. 1 Jan 1790, d. 14 May 1862 md. (1) Hannah Freeman, md. (2) Martha Kennedy
...............................................................................................
William
b. 21 June 1792, d. 24 Sept 1873, md. Sarah Hicks, b. 12 Jan 1795, d. 26 July 1882 at age 86 years, 6 months and 14 days
...............................................................................................
Enoch
b. 24 July 1794, d. 21 July 1883, md. Mary Sexton, b. 17 Jan 1796, d. 19 Oct 1868.
..............................................................................................
Elijah
b. 28 June 1798, d. 21 June 1862, md. Hannah Gibson, d. 25 Feb 1876
......................................................................................................
Asa
b. 1796 or 1800 ? d. 1829.
......................................................................................................
Sarah
Very little known. Sarah is listed before Phebe in the 1808 will of Benjamin. She was alive in 1808 will and in the Orphan system in 1812-1813
......................................................................................................
Phebe
b. 1804, d. 27 Sept 1881, md. Robert Mills


No mention of a Lewis Morris, said to have died young, was found.

Featured helpful link: Perquimans County Genealogy Page

NOTE: A Samuel or William Shatluck/Shattuck died on a ship sailing
from England to New England, America before 1642.  This man was
married to a woman named Damarius Hopkins. 

Samuel        Damarius 
OR (???)   +  Hopkins
William    |
Shatluck   |
/Shattuck  |
           |
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        Damarius  +  Issac      Issac Page was from Great Balloon, 
        Shattuck  |  Page       England.  He was a Quaker who left
                  |             Boston, Massachussetts, with his 
       +------+---+--+----+     family for North Carolina between
       |b. ca.|m. 3  |    |     1663-1664 and established residence
       |1634  |Sept  |    |     with his daughters Damarius and
       |d. in |1653  |d.4 |     Elizabeth.
       |Mass. |in    |May |
       |or NC |Boston|1680|
       +------+---+--+----+
                  |
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John     +  Damarius
Morris   |  Page
+--------+-------+
|m. 1678 |b. 1659|
|supposed|d. 12  |
|father  |Sept.  |
|of the  |1722   |
|John    |       |
|Morris  |       |
|below   |       |
+--------+-------+
         |
    ?    |
         |
John Morris  +  Mary Symons
             |
+------+-----+---+--------+
|b. 31 |m. 4     |b. 14   |
|March |September|December|
|1680  |1703     |1678    |
|d. in |         |d. 14   |
|Sept. |         |August  |
|1739  |         |1745    |
+------+-----+---+--------+
             |
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     Aaron Morris  +  Mary Pritchard
                   |
   +---------------+---------------+
   |b. 14 July 1704|b. 1706        |
   |d. 10 Sept 1770|d. October 1791|
   +---------------+---------------+
                   |
                Joseph  +  Mary 
                Morris  |  Newby
                        |
              +---------+--------+
              |b. 1 Feb.|m. 1 May|
              |1731     |1755    |
              |d. 10    |        |
              |September|        |
              |1770     |        |
              +---------+--------+
                        |
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                        +----+
                             |
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                           Benjamin + Sara
                           Morris   | (of NC)
                          +---------+
                          |b. 10 May|
                          |1757     |
                          |d. 25    |
                          |July 1808|
                          +---------+