Newby-Albertson-Nicholson-Hayward-De Cam Ancestry

Sources: I used the following sources, some of which are to be used judiciously; therefore there may be some mistakes in this tree, particularly the further back you go (where I used Wikipedia to fill in historical information). What you see here is as accurate as I can conclude given the sources I have perused. Lines and information are labeled unverified/questionable where applicable. ~ Jamie Johnson

Possible relation to William the Conqueror below!

    Eadnoth the Constable
a.k.a. Eadnoth the Staller
The Thane of Gloucester
b. ca. 1030-1035
Bristol, England
d. 1068
Bleadon, Somerset, England

According to Cheryl Grubb Christenson's Family Index,
m. possibly to
Rissa (De Montgomery) Berkeley (widow of Roger De Berkeley)
b. 1044
St. Germain, Montgomery, Normandy, France
d. 1069 or 1090
Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England
According to Wikipedia, Eadnoth "was an Anglo-Saxon landowner and steward to Edward the Confessor and King Harold II. He is mentioned in Domesday Book as holding thirty manors in Devon, Dorset, Somerset, and Wiltshire, before the Norman conquest. He may have been the same man as Eadnoth of Ugford, also known as Alnoth. Eadnoth was killed at Bleadon in 1068, leading a force against the two sons of Harold II, who had invaded Somerset. His son Harding became sheriff reeve of Bristol, and one of his grandsons was Robert Fitzharding, the ancestor of the Berkeley family of Berkeley Castle."                      
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According to Wikipedia, Harding "was sheriff reeve of Bristol, with responsibility for managing a manorial estate and perhaps similar duties to those of a magistrate. He was the son of Eadnoth the Constable, an Anglo-Saxon thane who served as steward to Edward the Confessor and Harold II. He was the father of Robert Fitzharding who became lord of Berkeley, Gloucestershire."

Harding FitzEadnoth
a.k.a.
Harding de Meriet
Lord of Merriot
Steward of Bristol 1103
Prince of Denmark, son of Eadnoth
b. ca. 1060
Gloucester, England
d. 5 May 1125
Baldwinstreet, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England

m.

Livida De Meriet
b. 1073
Tickenham, Long Ashton, Somerset, England
d. 1101
Whetonhurst, Gloucestershire, England
According to Cheryl Grubb Christenson's Family Index, The families with a "Fitz-" prefix go back to some of the supporters and soldiers of William the Conqueror, the first Norman king of England. It is an Anglican adulteration of the French phrase of "fils de" meaning "son of". This is typical naming technique found in Scandinavia and Scandinavian settlements such as in Scotland or Ireland where "Mac" is used. This prefix identifies the family with associations to early Scandinavian invaders and settlements of Normandy, France and England. Normandy was the home of Viking families and supporters of the Edward the Confessor, Harold and William the Conqueror.

According to A New England Genealogy, Ancestry of Pam & Jeff Martin:
Harding held as his principle holding the manor of Merriott (from whence de Meriet) in 1086 in Crewkerne, Somerset, England. He lost most of the lands previously held by his father, much of which had gone to Hugh of Chester, in 1086. He was a young man in 1086, since his second son lived until the 1170's.(1)

William of Malmesbury, speaking of Harding as then alive, tells us (3) that he was 'better used to whet his tongue in strife than to wield his arms in war.' This Harding may probably be identified with the Harding who, in 1062, subscribed the confessor's Waltham charter as 'reginæ pincerna' (4), and continued after the Conquest in the household of Eadgyth, appearing as a witness to the sale of Combe to Bishop Gisa, transacted in Eadgyth's presence at Wilton in 1072 (5). In 1086 he held lands in Gloucestershire in pledge of a certain Brihtric, who held them in the time of Edward the Confessor (6). It is safe to assume that Robert FitzHarding was his son. It is possible that Harding had an elder son, Nicolas, the ancestor of the family of Meriet. If this was so, the younger son soon outstripped the older in wealth.(7)

The parentage of Harding (living c. 1125) has been long and hotly disputed. He has been termed "son of the King of Denmark" (as in the petition of 1661), "Mayor of Bristol", and so forth. The view now generally accepted is that he was the son of Eadnoth (killed 1068), "Staller" to King Harold and to Edward the Confessor. E.A. Freeman pronounces this descent "in the highest degree probable." Eyton (in his "Shropshire") devoted much attention to the subject. Reference may also be made to the valuable researches of A. S. Ellis, and to Greenfield's most valuable Pedigree of Meriet, tracing the descent of that family from Nicholas de Meriet, elder brother to Robert Fitz Harding. The charters of Berkeley Castle were edited for Lord FitzHardinge in 1892 by I. H. Jeayes. Some genealogy websites also purport that Harding married the daughter of the King of Denmark, apparently confusing the above-mentioned petition of 1661. (8)

The following was in Dugdale's Baronage:

...That Harding... is by some said [Vet. MS. in castro de Berkley Lel Coll. Vol. 1. 912] to have been the youngest Son to one of the Kings of Denmark; and by [Lel. Itin. 420] others, Ex Regia Prosapia Fegum Daniæ ortus, Descended from the Royal Line of those Kings (which little differs in point of honor and dignity:) And that, accompanying Duke William of Normandy, in that signal expedition which he made into England, he was in that memorable Battle, with him, against King Harold, wherein being victor, he thenceforth became King of this Realm. But all I have farther seen of this Harding, is, That after that Conquest, he held Wirenhort (now called Whetenhust) in Com. Gloc. of Earl Brictrick, in mortgage; and that he died 6 Nov. 16. Hen. 1. Other Sons this Harding, before-specified, had, viz. Nicholas, who in 12 Hen. 2. residing in Somersetshire, held there two Knights Fees, and an half of the King; Elias, Jordan, and Maurice; as also three Daughters, Agnes, the Wife of Hugh de Haselee, Maud, and Cicely.(9)

Don't believe everything you read!
  Estmond Earl of Mercia m. Godiva, possible sister to William I the Conqueror
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According to Wikipedia, Robert "was an Anglo-Saxon nobleman from Bristol who was granted the feudal barony of Berkeley in Gloucestershire. He rebuilt Berkeley Castle, and founded the Berkeley family which still occupies it today. He was a wealthy Bristol merchant and a financier of Henry Plantagenet, Duke of Aquitaine, who was the rival of King Stephen (1135-54) during the period known as The Anarchy and who subsequently became King Henry II (1154-89). Fitzharding founded St. Augustine's Abbey, which after the Reformation became Bristol Cathedral. Many members of the Berkeley family were buried within it, and some of their effigies survive there. As J. Horace Round asserted he was one of the very few Anglo-Saxon noblemen who managed to retain their noble status in Norman England and successfully integrate with the Norman nobility, if not the only one.

Robert "The Devoute" FitzHarding
b. 1095
d. 1170
m. Eve FitzEstmond "The Prioress"  
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      Nicholas FitzRobert/FitzHarding
b. 1124
Gloucestershire, Coaly, England
d. May 5, 1189

m.

Ala DeTickenham
b. 1130
Tickenham, Long Ashton, Somerset, England
d. 1195
England
her father: Guido De Tickenham
       
Ansculf
William Paynel
d. ca. 1087
A Norman, possibly of Les Moutiers-Hubert


William FitzAnsculf
Tenant-in-chief of Dudley in Domesday

Fulk (I) Paynel
Feudal baron (2nd class) of Dudley, Worcs.
d. pre 1138

Beatrice

                         m.                         


Ralph Paynel
Feudal baron (2nd class) of Dudley, Worcs.
d. pre 1153
         
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      Roger FitzNicholas
b. 1190
Hull, Gloucestershire, Coaly, England
d. 1230
Gloucestershire, England
m. Hawisa/Hawise Paynel
(widow of John de Somery)
b. ca. 1129-1160
d. ca. 1208-1209
         
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      Nicholas
b. ?
England
d. 1262
         
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      Ralph De Cam
b. 1216
England
d. 1287
Cam, Gloucestershire, England
                           
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      Henry De Cam
b. 1270
England
d. ?
                           
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James Hayward
b. 1350
    Roger De Cam
b. 1325
England
d. ?
                           
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John Heyward
b. 1370
England
d. ?
Lucia Harding
b. 1380
England
d. ?
                           
m.                            
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William Hayward
b. 1405
d. ?
m. Jane Wilcox
b. 1405
d. ?
                             
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  William Hayward
b. 1430
(suspicious date)
d. ?
m. Elizabeth Brocton
b. 1431
(suspicious date)
d. ?
                           
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    William Hayward
b. 1430
England
d. ?
England
m. Joan Wilcock
b. 1463
(suspicious date)
Rotherham, Yorkshire, England
d. 1512
Mercers Chapel, London, England
                         
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  William Nicholson
b. 1430
Yorkshire, England
d. ?
Kingston On Hull, Yorkshire, England

m.

Anne
(maiden name unknown)
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John Nicholson
b. 1460
England
d. 1520
England
Elizabeth Hayward
b. 1465
England
d. ?
England
m.
Robert Barber
b. 1477
Yorkshire, England
d. ?
England
Anna Dunscombe
b. 1465
England
d. ?
England
m.
  William Ward
b. 1460
England
d. ?
                 
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  John Nicholson
b. 1488
Yorkshire, England
d. 1559
England
m. Anne Barber
b. 1490
Hertfordshire, England
d. ?
England
    Simeon Ward
b. 1490
England
d. ?
England
                 
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        Anthony Haughton
b. 1562
St. Stephan Colman London, London, England
d. ?
m. Alice Fetherlande
b. 1592
(suspicious date perhaps 1562 was meant)
St Stephan Colman London, London, England
d. ?
   
  Thomas Nicholson
b. 1520
Huggate York, Yorkshire, England
d. 1795
England
m. Isabel Ward
b. 1522
Middlesex, England
d. 1584
Newcastle, England
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William Croffe
b. 1520
England
d. ?
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          Benjamin Redknap/Rednap
b. 1565
England
d. ?
Middlesex, England

m.

Elizabeth Redknap/Rednap
b. 1558
England
d. 30 April 1669
      John Haughton
b. 1588
(suspicious date since daughter was reported born in 1595; perhaps 1578 was meant)
London, England
     
    William Nicholson
b. 1550
England
d. 1591
England
m. Winifrey Croffe
b. ?
England
d. ?
Huggate, Yorkshire, England
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Newby Name Meaning
English: habitational name from any of the various places in northern England named with the Middle English elements newe 'new' + by 'farm', 'settlement' (of Old Norse origin).
Source: Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press
According to page 171 of The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011), "The unusual surname Newby is of medieval English origin, and likely adopted from any of the various places named that in northern England. For example, Newby in Cumberland is recorded as 'Neubi' in the Register of the Priory of Wetherhal (ca 1165); the place in Westmorland is registered in the Early Yorkshire Charters as 'Neuby' (ca 1160); and in Yorkshire as 'Neuby' in the Percy Chartulary (ca 1240). All of the locations are believed to have been given the name from the Middle English words 'newe' meaning new and 'by' meaning a farm; hence a 'new farm.'" The name is also seen in records as Neuby, Neubi, Newbie and Nubi.

Note: The first Newby ancestor I am certain of is James Newby listed below. These earlier generations are possibly in his ancestry.

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Thomas Nicholson
b. 1590
(suspicious date)
England
d. ?
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m.


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Alice Kenyon
b. 1586
(suspicious date)
England
d. ?
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William Simpson
b. 1589
Huggate, Yorkshire, England
d. ?
England
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      Joseph Redknap/Rednap
b. 1597
London, England
d. ?
Essex, Massachussetts
m. Sarah Haughton
b. 1595
England
d. 1617
(This date is suspicious as are many in the Haughton line; her daughter was born 1641, which means she was at least alive until 1641)
Lynn, Essex, Massachussetts
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  William Newby
b. 1580
in England

+

unknown wife
    Edmund Nicholson
b. 1593
Bootle, England
He was in Marblehead, Massachussetts by 1644-1645 or before

"Edmund Nicholson also appeared in court relatively often; he seems to not have been a person afraid of standing up for his rights or defending himself in disputes."

d. drowned at sea 4 June 1660
Massachusetts

"Incredibly, because of Elizabeth's leanings towards Quakerism, which church leaders despised with a fanatical vengeance, Elizabeth and her two sons were accused of drowning her husband." Refer to the right for details.

Source for above quotes and this couple: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, pp. 281-282

m. ca. 1637 Elizabeth Simpson
b. 1617
Boothy, England
d. 1674
Essex, Massachusetts
"George Bishop, in his book New England Judged originally published in 1667, provided an account of the court's charges against the family. In his book, which addressed the Boston officials, Bishop wrote that Elizabeth and her sons were 'charged with the death of Edmund Nicholson, her husband, and their father, who was found dead in the sea.' This was based on the solid evidence that the three were witches. Remember, Marblehead was next to Salem, and nobody loved a good witch trial quite like the lunatics in Massachusetts. According to Bishop's contemporaneous account, Elizabeth was fined 'a great sum' which was taken in 'good fish' and 'in barrels of mackerel, so devouring the widow's house.'

Elizabeth's two sons were placed in a butcher's cub (holding pen) at Boston, where they were forced to stand for hours under a gallows with ropes around their necks. The sons were also 'whipped in your market-place, which was performed with many bloody lashes.' The young men were 'whipped also at Salem, where Michelson, the marshal, a bloody-spirited man, came to see it executed, where it was so mercilessly done, that one of the young men sunk down or fainted away under the torture of his cruel suffering, whose body they raised up again, and his senses came to him.' As historian Ray Winslow Jr. wrote, the charges were founded 'upon no evidence but stemming from the official prejudice against Quakers, the matter became an example of the lengths to which Massachusetts would go in persecuting Quakers.'

Eventually, after they got their fill of witch torture, the court let the three go."
(Source: Hunt, p. 282)
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      William Charles
b. 1595 (some have 1599)
England
d. 1673
Salem, Massachussetts

m.

Sarah
(maiden name unknown)
b. 1595
d. 29 April 1677
in Marblehead, Massachusetts
John Bailey
b.
d. 2 November 1651
Anna Bagenal
b.
d.
m.
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Palmer Bailey
b. ca. 1578, Great Milton, Oxfordshire, England
m. Permilla (b. ca. 1580, England; d. ca. 1676, Little Compton, New County, RI)
d. after ca. 1608
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William Bailey, Sr.
b. 1606, Great Milton, Oxfordshire, England
By tradition, he came from London and was a "weaver of silk ribbon"
(Hunt, p. 271).
m. ca. 1640 to Grace (mnu, not Parsons) in Newport, Rhode Island.
Moved ca. 1662-1666 to old Albemarle County, North Carolina, (later Perquimans Precinct, then Perquimans County, North Carolina)
d. before 20 July 1676, likely Newport, Aquidneck Island, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, p. 271
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Thomas Atwood of Middlesex, England
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"The origins of the William Charles whom Abigail Bailey married in Rhode Island are unknown. Others have attempted to establish him as the son of another William Charles who lived in Marblehead, Massachusetts at least by 1648, but that is simply guesswork" (p. 274, The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011).

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UNVERIFIED
?

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    Ann Atwood
b.
d.

After Christopher died, Ann married Richard Dorman. "After Dorman's death she married a third time to Richard Cheston, a cooper, on 2 January 1711/1712."

Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, p. 286

Christopher Nicholson
b. 1638
England

Faced great difficulty due to false accusations in his father's death in 1660.

Involved in Culpeper's Rebellion 1677-1679
d. 8 December 1688
Perquimans, NC
Hannah Redknap/Rednap
b. 1641
Middlesex, England
d. 2 December 1678, less than a week after her 7th child, likely a result of childbirth
Perquimans, NC
      William Charles
b. 1632
Rhode Island, USA (some have b. 1635, Perquimmans County, North Carolina )
d. 6 August 1677
Perquimans, NC
Abigail Bailey
b. ca. 1640, likely in Newport, RI
d. 17 March or May 1687
Berkeley, Perquimans, NC

She "was the eldest child, and married William Charles in Rhode Island before moving to North Carolina. The proof that 'Abigall Balie,' wife of William Charles, was the same person as Abigail, the eldest child of William and Grace Bailey, comes from the will of Abigail's daughter Jane Charles, dated 1688 in Perquimans Precinct, North Carolina, in which she named, among others, her 'Aunt Marce Stepney' who was Mercy (a.k.a. Marcy) Bailey, Abigail's sister who married John Stepney in NC in 1681.
Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, pp. 273-274

  Ralph Newby   Dorothy Hinchley
m. 11 April 1680

"The record of the marriage of 'Cristopher Necholson of Paquimance River in ye County of albemarle & Ann atwood of ye same County,' dated 11 April 1680, is the oldest record in existence for the Perquimans Monthly Meeting." (p. 285, The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011)

      m. 22 October 1662
Moved to NC ca. 1669
Source for this couple: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, pp. 167, 283-285
      m. ca. 1660
Source for Ralph Newby's baptism, marriage, migration, death and burial dates: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011), pp. 171-172. b. March 1612, Northumberland, England
(baptized 14 March 1612, the parish of Easington, County Durham, England)

d. May 1682, Dublin, Ireland
Burial: Friend's cemetery at Stephens Green near Dublin on 18 May 1682
m. 22 May 1636 at Easington, England

ca. 1662, the family moved to Dublin, Ireland, likely because of religious persecution of the Quakers in England
b. 12 October 1617
Ireland
d. 14 December 1711, Dublin, Ireland
Burial: Friend's cemetery at Stephens Green near Dublin
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        Nicholas Albertson
b. 1616
d. ?

m.

Mary Sutton
b. 1620
in Perquimans, NC
d. ?
  Samuel Nicholson
b. 12 March 1665
likely in Marblehead, Massachusetts
d. 29 March 1727/1728
Perquimans Co., NC

"Samuel Nicholson was a justice of the Perquimans County court from January 1696/1697 to April 1701. He was also a Burgess in the colonial Assembly in 1708."

Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, p. 287

m. 16 December 1688

"Elizabeth was the young lady, who at the age of about 18, became the head of the family because her parents and five older siblings had all died. The couple married 'at ye quarterly meeting' at Jonathan Phelps' house."

Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, p. 287

Elizabeth Charles
b. ca. 1663-1670
Rhode Island
d. 1747
Perquimans, NC
 
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Isabel

Source for William being son of Ralph and Dorothy and his baptism: p. 172, The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt (2011)

William Newby   |
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print

?? The Questionable Ancestry of Albert Albertson ??

↓ (scroll to read all) ↓

"It is frequently repeated that Albert Albertson was the son of Nicholas Albertson of Scituate, Massachusetts. The Scituate inhabitant was called 'Nicholas Albeson the Swede' in a report by soldiers of the town during Phillip's War in 1676. Records of the Colony of New Plymouth identify Nicholas Albeson in 1674 as one who was brought before the court for various offenses, including 'breach of the Sabbath and pilfering and telling a lye in his examination' and who was 'centanced by the Court to be publickly whipt' which 'accordingly was inflicted.' ... The book Old Scituate also describes that in 1676, the hut of 'Nicholas the sweede Albeson' burned down and the town later voted to allow him three pounds towards rebuilding his house.

Though it is possible that our ancestor, Albert Albertson, could have been related to the Nicholas Albertson of Massachusetts, it is not likely, and there is no evidence whatsoever to support that hypothesis. It is more likely that our ancestor, Albert Albertson, was of English origin. Albertson is an English language patronymic surname meaning the obvious, i.e., 'son of Albert,' and records of its use for centuries can be found in that country" (p. 289, The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011).

 
Ancestry through parents George and Sarah (Tilden) Sutton
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b. 1632
Scotland
d. 1671
North Carolina, USA
m. b. August 1637
Durham, England
Baptized 14 Aug 1637 at Easington, County Durham, England
d. 1701
Virginia, USA
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"The first Albertson ancestor of whom we can be certain was an Albert Albertson, who was in North Carolina very early, at least by 1668 when he married there" (p. 289, The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011). Albert Albertson
b. 1643
in NC
d. 28 February 1701/1702
in Perquiman, NC
m. 25 December 1668, Perquimans Co., NC Mary Sutton
b. ca. 1642 (per Descendants of GEORGE AND SARAH TILDEN SUTTON, p. 14)
in England
d. 10 January 1720
in Perquiman, NC

The wife of Albert Albertson, Mary (Sutton) Gosby, was born Mary Sutton. She was a widow of John Gosby/Gosbey of Long Island. She was daughter of George Sutton and Sarah Tilden, daughter of Puritan immigrants Nathaniel Tilden and Lydia Huckstep of Scituate, MA.
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John Newby

"John is a 'maybe' son who died prior to 1692 when his widow Magdalene married Matthew Colley. John and his wife named one of their sons Gabriel, an uncommon name" (p. 174, The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011).

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Page 3 of Abstract of North Carolina Wills compliled by J. Bryan Grimes, 1910, states the following about this Albert Albertson:

Albertson, Albert, Sr. Perquimans Precinct.
February 10, 1701. April 14, 1702. Sons: Peter, Nathaniel, Albert and Easaw. Wife not named. Executors: Peter and Nathaniel Albertson (sons). Witnesses: John Falconer, Nathaniel Nickolson, Joseph Suton. Clerk of the Court: John Stepney.

 

Page 3 of Abstract of North Carolina Wills compliled by J. Bryan Grimes, 1910, states the following about the above Mary:

Albertson, Mary Perquimans County.

Will not dated. Probated January 10, 1720-1721. Sons: Albert. Grandchildren: Mary, John and Elisabeth Albertson. Executor: Albert Albertson (son). Witnesses: Thomas Stafford, Albert Albertson, Jr.. Clerk of the Court: Richard Leary.

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James "Jeams" Newby Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, pp. 286, 291 Sarah Nicholson               Nathaniel Albertson   Abigail Nicholson        
b. ca. 1670 according to Lew Griffin's research m. 5 May 1699 according to Lew Griffin's research b. 15 August 1682
d. 13 May 1718
 

Page 3 of Abstract of North Carolina Wills compliled by J. Bryan Grimes, 1910, states the following about this Nathaniel Albertson:

Albertson, Nathaniel Perquimans County.
December 4, 1751. January Court, 1752. Sons: Joshua (land on Long Branch and Creek Swamp), William (“my manner plantation”), Aaron. Grandsons: Benjamin and Chalkley Albertson. Daughters: Hannah Albertson, Elizabeth Newby, Lydda Trueblood. Negroes bequeathed to sons. Three sons appointed executors. Witnesses: Joshua Perisho, James Henbe, Mary Morris. Clerk of the Court: Edmund Hatch.

b. ca. 1685
North Carolina
d. 1752-1753
Perquiman, North Carolina

The 1752 Will of Nathaniel Albertson mentions his daughter Elizabeth Newby. An abstract of the will is at p. 3, Abstract of North Carolina Wills compliled by J. Bryan Grimes, 1910.
m. 12 July 1705
The Perquimans Co., NC, precinct register record states "Nathanl. Albertson & Abigaill Nicholson took each other for Man & wife att a Meeting held att the House of Saml. Nicholson the 12th of the 5th Month 1705" (12 July 1705), noting that back then, the 5th month was July as they were using the Julian calendar, not the Gregorian one. The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, p. 290.
b. 24 September 1689
Berkeley Pct Perquimans, North Carolina
d. 1724-1726, definitely by 1728 (The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, p. 291)
Perquimans, North Carolina
   
                       
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  Samuel Newby Source: The History of the Hunt Family by Roger D. Hunt, 2011, p. 291 Elizabeth Albertson

She is mentioned in her father's will: "I give my Daughter Elizabeth Newby one Barrell of Pork to her & her disposal." An abstract of the will is at p. 3, Abstract of North Carolina Wills compliled by J. Bryan Grimes, 1910.
       
  b. 23 August 1704 according to Lew Griffin's research m. 11 November 1725 b. 10 September 1708
Perquimans, North Carolina
d. 1750
Pasquotank Co., NC
       
                     
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      Mary Newby
(daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Newby)

Source for dates and marriage: p. 394 of History of Perquimans County by Ellen Goode Rawlings Winslow, particularly the Henry Newby Family excerpt.


Joseph Morris
           

Source for dates and marriage: p. 394 of the book History of Perquimans County by Ellen Goode Rawlings Winslow

b. 28 July 1732, Pasquotank, North Carolina
d. 9 July 1763 (9, 5th month of Julian Calendar 1763), Perquimans, North Carolina
m. June 1755 b. 1 February 1731
d. 10 September 1770
           
                       
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Descendants
             
This line was not available in retro.