Normandy to England Ancestry

Sources:

This is currently being researched.

                                                                                                                             
               
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
 
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
                               
                  |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
      |
|
|
                                 
    Ancestry through parents Richard I, "The Fearless", Duke of Normandy, and Gunnor(a)         Conan I 'le Tort' de Rennes, duc de Bretagne
b.
d. 27 June 992, Conquereuil, Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France (killed in battle)
m. Ermengarde Gerberga d'Anjou, Duchesse de Bretagne
b. 11 November 958, Duchy of Anjou (now Pays de la Loire), France
d. 27 June 1022, Duchy of Anjou (now Pays de la Loire), France
     
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
     
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
     
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
     
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
                         
    |
|
|
          |
|
|
          |
|
|
          |
|
|
          |
|
|
          |
|
|
                           
    Richard II, Duke of Normandy
(Richard FitzRichard "The Good")
b. 23 August 963, Lot-et-Garonne, Aquitaine, France
d. 28 August 1026, Fécamp, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
m. Judith of Brittany
b. 982, France
d. 16 June 1017, France
         
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
         
b.
d.
m.
b.
d.
           

Ancestry through parents Robert II of France and Contance of Arles
     
      |
|
|
              |
|
|
              |
|
|
              |
|
|
   
    Robert The Devil
"Also called Robert the Magnificent. The father of William the Conqueror, Robert became Duke of Normandy in 1027. He was a capable ruler who did much to stabilize Normandy. In 1031, in exchange for his support of the King of France, he received the Vexin (qv). He died while returning from a pilgrmiage to Jerusalem in 1035" (Source: King, p. 91).
Robert FitzRichard
(Robert I, Duke of Normandy)
(Robert the Magnificent)
b. 22 June 1000, Rouen, Seine Inferieure, Haute-Normandie, France
d. 3 July 1035, Bahçelievler, Istanbul, Turkey
unmarried Herleva
(Herleva of Falaise)
b. ca. 1003, Falaise, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France
d. ca. 1050, Eure, Upper Normandy, France
 

Seal of Baldwin V (Source)
  Baldwin V, Count of Flanders
b. ca. 19 August 1012, Bihorel, Seine-Maritime, Normandy, France
d. 1 September 1067, Lille, Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
m. Adela of France, Countess of Flanders
b. 5 March 1009, Toulouse, Haute-Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées, France
d. January 1079, Mesen, West-Vlaanderen, Vlaams Gewest, Belgium

     
        |
|
|
                  |
|
|
       
        |
|
|
|
|
|
                |
|
|
     
        |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

descendants through daughter
Adelaide
(Adela of Normandy
Comtesse d'Aumale)
via her marriage to
Lambert II,
Count of Lens
                |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
     
        |
|
|
                  |
|
|
     

The Bayeux Tapestry

depicting the Battle of Hastings
14 October 1066

"An embroidered tapestry over two hundred feet long detailing the story of the Norman Conquest. It was commisoned from Kentish embroiderers in 1067 by Bishop Odo, the Earl of Kent and William the Conqueror's half-brother. The tapestry is displayed in the bishop's palace in Bayeux" (Source: King, p. 34).

Scroll horizontally to see it all.
(Thanks to Wikipedia)

William the Conqueror
(King William I of England)

b. 14 October 1024 or ca. 1028, Château de Base, Falaise, Calvados, Normandie, France
d. 9 September 1087, Prieuré de Saint-Gervais, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France
(from wounds suffered at the siege of Mantes)
Burial: Abbatiale Saint-Étienne, Abbaye aux Hommes, Caen, Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France

William was the acknowledged illegitimate son of Robert III, Duke of Normandy. Born at Falaise in 1027, the barons of Normandy accepted him as his father's heir when Duke Robert died in 1035. His youth was fraught with danger, but he survived numerous plots and rebellions to emerge by 1063 as the single most powerful lord in France, a man with the ambition and talent to seize a throne.

William was forced to spend the early years of his reign subduing the generally localized opposition that remained after Harold's death. Effective control of northern England was not accomplished until 1069. Although England was wealthy, the invaders regarded their new won lands as secondary to their holdings in Normandy. William I in fact, spent more time in Normandy than England during his reign. He did ensure that Saxon opposition was deprived of possible figureheads, replacing the earls and bishops of England with Norman appointees.

William began the building of the Tower of London in 1078, founded Newcastle in 1079, and began the Domesday book, the ambitious project of census of the kingdom in the 1080's. On his death in 1087 he divided his lands among his sons, his eldest son Robert becoming Duke of Normandy, and William II "Rufus" becoming the second Norman king of England.

(Source: King, p. 8)

William was also called "William the Bastard, William of Normandy, and the Tanner (a reference to his mother's family). William claimed the English throne after the death of Edward the Confessor, and enforced his claim by defeating Harold II at the Battle of Hastings. He instituted Norman feudal practices but retained the Anglo-Saxon shire court, sheriff and fyrd (qv). He ordered the making of the Domesday Book in 1086.

In 1087 he disputed control of the Vexin (qv) with King Philip I of France. Philip angered William making an insulting joke about the English king: hearing that the Conqueror had grown fat, and had been confined to his bed from illness, Philip expressed surprise that William should be so long in labour, and suggested that no doubt there would be a great churching when he delivered. (Cynics may find Philip's views on obesity amusing; he was grossly fat, so much so that he was barely able to stand. His sobriquet, 'the Fair' was meant as sarcasm.) William replied that as soon as he was up he would 'be churched in Notre Dame, and present so many lights as would give little pleasure to the King of France.' On his recovery he immediately gathered an army and led them into the Ile de France. While taking the town of Mantes he suffered a riding accident and died a short time later. He is buried at Caen" (Source: King, p. 106).


m. 1051/1052

Matilda of Flanders,
Queen Consort of England
b. ca. 1031, Ghent, East Flanders, Flanders, Belgium
d. 2 November 1083, Base-Normandie, Caen, Calvados, Normandy, France
Burial: Abbaye-aux-Dames, Place de la Reine Mathilde, Caen, Basse-Normandie, France

     
          |
|
       

Henry, the youngest son of William the Conqueror was an aggressive and engergetic man. His reign was marked by his careful, harsh and methodical personality, and his mastery of the arts of government. He was also a plotter; when his elder brothers quarrelled he changed sides repeatedly, seeking his own advantage and eventually making himself thoroughly distrusted by both. In 1091 Robert and William made a treaty whereby they agreed if either died without leaving an heir, one would be succeeded by the other. The express intent of this treaty was to disinherit their brother.

When Duke Robert mortgaged Normandy and went on Crusade, Henry's chances seemed to improve, but by the summer of 1100 news came that Robert was returning from triumph in Jerusalem. Perhaps William II's death in the New Forest on August 2 was coincidental; it is worth noting, however, that Henry was also hunting in the forest that day. When he heard of his brother's death he quickly rode to Winchester to take possession of the Treasury, and from there to Westminster to be crowned on August 5.

Henry wisely restored the laws of Edward the Confessor and William the Conqueror which had been eroded during his brother's reign. He invited Anselm back to England, married Edith, the sister of King Edgar of Scotland, and pursued a policy of making concessions and granting favours to the English barons. Henry also secured alliances with France and Flanders. By all of this Henry ensured that when hsi brother Robert invaded in November of 1101 he could make little progress. Eventually a treaty was arranged between the bothers.

Over the next few years Henry, like William before him, gradulally expanded his influence in Normandy. In 1106 the issue was settled at the Battle of Tinchebral. Robert was captured and spent the last twenty eight years of his life as Henry's prisoner. The same fate befell other barons who fell into the king's hands.

In secular affairs Henry I was a tough and tenacious king who knew how to keep men loyal. He won few hearts, but his barons looked to him for reward and feared his wrath. The lesson he had taught in 1090 by pushing a man off the top of Rouen Castle for betraying an oath was not lost on his vassals.
...
Henry's major accomplishment was developing an efficient civil service, in particular the court of the exchequer. Roger of Salisbury became the model bureaucrat, competent and discreet. He also ensured tha thte law was administered during his reign with strictness, and the mass of his subjects benefited from this.

After 1106 Henry spent much of his reign in France fighting the traditional enemies of Norman dukes. In 1118 he spent the entire year fighting the King of France, the Count of Anjou, and the Count of Flanders. There were many similar years, and England paid for the wars with numerous taxes. By 1119 Henry seemed secure. The king who never risked battle until he had won the diplomatic victory, beat King Louis VI of France at the Battle of Bremule. Angevin friendship was ensured by the marriage of William, his heir and only legitimate son, to the daughter of the Count of Anjou.

Unfortunately for Henry's plans, William drowned in the wreck of the White Ship in November 1120, ensuring that the remaining years of Henry's reign would be dominated by the problem of succession. It is said that Henry never smiled again on being told the news of his son's death. Only a cynic would suggest that his sorrow was more political than parental.

Soon after William's death, Henry married Adelaide of Louvaine (Edith had died in 1118) but no heir was born. The king's only legitimate child was his daughter Matilda, married to the Emperor of Germany. When the Emperor died in 1125, Henry recalled her to England and forced his barons to swear an oath to accept her if he died without a male heir.

To continue the Angevin alliance, Henry arranged a marriage between Matilda and Geoffrey of Anjou, then sixteen. THis marriage, coupled with Matilda's high-handed arrogance, did not please the Norman barons, or Matilda. Henry's stubborn refusal to give up any power to his daughter and her husband during his lifetime resulted in them going to war with him in 1135. Henry died in France on December 1 of that year, of dysentery caused by over-indulging in a feast of lampreys.

(Source: King, p. 9).

King Henry I of England
(Henry Beauclerc)
b. ca. September 1068, Selby, North Yorkshire, England
d. 1 December 1135, Saint-Denis-le-Ferment, Department de Eure, Haute Normandie, France

Photo credit: © Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

"Alan fitz Flaald became a close friend of Henry, later King Henry I of England, during the period when Henry controlled Mont-Saint-Michel as Count of the Cotentin" in western Normandy (Fox, p. 73).

       
          |
|
|

descendants by a concubine through son
Robert De Caen
via marriage to
Maud (Mable/Sibyl) Fitz Hamon
         
Developed in November 30-Decebmer 1, 2020.