Kearns (Keerans) and Ivey (Ivy) Ancestry

Sources:

   
 
Adam Ivey, Sr.
b. ca. 1640s
d. by 1710
Appears to have immigrated to Charles City Co., VA, in the 1670s. He was likely a small-scale tenant tobacco farmer.

m.

Elizabeth
of Prince George Co. and Weyanoke Parish
d. ca. 1720
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IVEY


Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird
   
Thomas Sledge
b. 20 March 1585, Batcombe, Somerset, England
d. 1629
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Richard Sledge
b. March 1607, Batcombe, Somerset, England
d. 1699 in England
Mary Cole
b. 1609, Batcombe, Somerset, England
d. 1672
m.
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Richard Sledge
b. October 19, 1634, Somerset, England
m. to Ann (maiden name unknown)
d. 1725 in Virginia

Source: Geni.com
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Katherine Flake

b. 1631, Virginia
d. 1722, Virginia

Sources: Geni.com and Ancestry.com
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Robert Clark (Clarke)

b. 1631, England, United Kingdom
d. 1673, Surry, Surry County, Virginia

Sources: Geni.com and Ancestry.com
Elizabeth Flake

b. 1659 (Appears to be a wrong date given daughter's birth date), Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight County, Virginia
d. 1717, Surry, Surry County, Virginia

Sources: Geni.com and Ancestry.com
m.
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  George Ivey
b. ca. 1670
d. after 1737
Lived in Prince George Co., VA
m. Ruth   Charles Sledge
b. 1650, Shropshire, England
d. 1727, Surry, Virginia
m. Mary Rebecca Clark (Clarke)
b. 1652, Isle of Wight, Virginia
d. 1728, Surry, Virginia

KEARNS

The name Kearns:

Doug Kearns corresponded with a William Kearns of Liverpool, England, who advised that the Irish Gaelic Language does not contain a "K" and "C" takes the place of the "K", as in Carns, Currins, Currans. I have also seen the name Cairn(s). However, according to Ancestry.com, Kearns is the "Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Céirín 'descendant of Céirín' (supported by Gene Kearns, a personal name from a diminutive of ciar 'dark', 'black'. English patronymic -s has been added superfluously" and a variant of the Irish Carnes.

Sue Keirns Mulero shared that Kearns was spelled Keirns when the family got to Ohio. Another branch of the family settled in Indiana and spelled it Kearns.

Still, there was another possibility at one time according to Doug Kearns. In Switzerland, there is a little town named KERNS that dates back to 1200 AD. He had read a book about the Amish who were persecuted because of their strict religious ways. They began in Switzerland and slowly made their way up the Rhine River to Holland where they boarded boats for the New World. There are numerous Kerns in Germany. Thousands of Germans migrated to Ireland during the late 1600's and early 1700's. They probably didn't find what they expected and when the opportunity was right they jumped on a boat to America. So the name may bring in an ancestry of Irish, German, and Swiss heritage. Whether or not Kerns and Kearns are related is uncertain, though. UPDATE: In December 2017, Gene Kearns, whose late aunt Luna Kearns Hames did extensive research, had this to say: "My aunt had spoken to a Swiss fellow many years ago and dismissed that side of the story. Clearly, there were Waldensian families in nearby counties, but they seemed to always stick to the Kerns spelling." DNA supports an Irish origin for my Kearns line depicted on this page.

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    The 1725 will of Charles Sledge leaves a yearling heifer to "my daughter Rebecca Ivy". (Charles Sledge was by then living on his patents on Pigeon Swamp near John Ivey in what would later be Sussex County.) Charles Sledge's widow, Mary Sledge, made her own will on 8 January 1727, bequeathing a breeding cow to her daughter "Rebecca Ivie". Her will was witnessed by Edward and Elizabeth Prince, possibly the daughter and son-in-law of Adam Ivey, and her son-in-law Peter Hay was executor. Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird |
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↓ Read more below ↓ or ↓ View the Kearns tree below ↓

Henry Ivey, Sr.
b. ca. 1695
d. 1774, Southampton Co., VA
m. ca. 1725 Rebecca Sledge
b. circa 1700 Surry County, Virginia
d. between 1738 and 1765, Southampton County, Virginia

According to Ancestry.com in referring to the Dictionary of American Family Names (© 2013, Oxford University Press), the Kearns name meaning is Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Céirín 'descendant of Céirín', a personal name from a diminutive of ciar 'dark', 'black'. English patronymic -s has been added superfluously.

↓ Read more below ↓ or ↓ View the Kearns tree below ↓

Original Kearns Mystery

According to the book FARMER: Yesterday and Today (Zeb R. Denny, editor; published by Wooten Printing Co., Inc. in Welcome, NC), p. 120, William T. and Mary King Kearns came to America from Ireland between 1760 and 1765, the name spelled variably from KEERANS to KEARNS (Gene Kearns also mentions Keirns and Keeranes). He settled on Second Creek, North Carolina, just 3 miles south of Farmer, NC, in Concord Township (Randolph Co.). The FARMER book on p. 120 lists William T. Kearns, Sr., and Mary King (Mary King Kearns) as the parents of Thomas Kearns, husband of Rebecca Ivy. On p. 183, the book has the content of a Bible Excerpt: Ivy Kearns, which says that John Kearns is the father of Thomas Kearns.

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"These [deed/land] records are vital to differentiating this Henry Ivey from his cousin of the same name. First, they establish that it was Henry Ivey, the son of George Ivey, who lived in Southampton County and died there in 1774. Second, they tell us that this Henry Ivey, son of George, consistently signed his name to documents, in contrast to his first cousin who signed with a mark. That, and the Sledge connection, means he is virtually certain to be the same Henry Ivey who signed his name as a witness to the will of Samuel Clark on 12 June 1736 in what was then Brunswick County. This Samuel Clark was the brother of Mary Clark Sledge, wife of Charles Sledge, and therefore the uncle of Henry Ivey's wife. It seems clear that Henry Ivey was married to Rebecca Sledge, son of Charles and Mary Sledge. The long-accepted theory is that his uncle, also named Henry Ivey, was the husband of Rebecca Sledge. However, we know that Rebecca Sledge's brother John was not born until about 1700, thus she was likely much too young to have been the wife of a second-generation Ivey and mother of third-generation Iveys . Further, we know this Henry Ivey was married to a wife named Rebecca in 1737, when he lived quite close to Rebecca Sledge's parents, while the name of his uncle's wife appears in no records" (Baird, pp. 11-12).

The memorial stone of Thomas Kearns states that John Kearns is the father of Thomas Kearns, husband of Rebecca Ivey (Note that the memorial stone would have been added in more recent times and so is not necessarily authoritative). Is John the father of Thomas and possibly Isaac and Silas? Some sources indicate William T. Kearns is the progenitor. John was in Rowan (now Randolph Co., NC) in 1768 as a taxpayer. Much of this information comes from Doug Kearns in 2005. According to p. 547 of North Carolina: The Old North State and the New, Volume 3 (by Archibald Henderson, © 1941, Lewis Publishing Company), William is the father (source provided by Thom Cameron, researcher of James Cameron and Mary "Polly" Kearns Cameron -- via correspondence in 2013).

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David Adams
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Thom Cameron has found a John Kearns in 1762 in Rowan County, NC (could be the area of now Davidson County). Thom pointed out where the first child of Mary King named is Jonathan Kearns (1761-1850), which is the traditional naming pattern if the father is John or Jonathan (though Thom lists William T. Kearns as the father on Ancestry). Yet, Thom reports that William T. Kearns' first son with his first wife Catherine Hotzenbella (1742-1776) was Nicholas Kearns, which does not follow the traditional naming pattern (i.e., the Jonathan does not imply the father was named John or Jonathan). William T. Kearns was never married to Catherine Hotzenbella. Gene Kearns had this to say in December 2017: I've run across the "William T. Kearns' first son with his first wife Catherine Hotzenbella..." story before and it seems to have nothing to do with our families. This couple apparently lived their entire lives in Virginia and to believe they have something to do with our William Kearns involves the assumption of illegitimate children and I don't remember what all.... it seemed like such an incredible stretch, at the time, I didn't even take notes. Their child, Nicholas Kearns ... settled in Ohio. Gene indicated that if there is documentary evidence of a John Kearns in or near Randolph County, NC, it is likely [our] William's oldest son who was born in Ireland (and this also falsifies claims that he settled in West Virginia). Sue Keirns Mulero, 4th great granddaughter of Jonathan Kearns, indicated in August 2019 that Catherine Hotzenbella was not a wife to William per a record showing Catherine Hotzenbella was married Henry Kearns (echoed by a July 2019 post which also suggests the reader See "The Children of Alexander Taylor and Catharina Carnes" for greater detail of the 1810 Charleston Kanawha Co WV census). As of July 2017, Sue had a lack of DNA connection suggesting Jonathan was a son of William T. Kearns. However, as of August 2019, she and her brothers found multiple DNA connections to descendants of Isaac Kearns below, which suggest that her 4x great grandfather Jonathan was a son of William T. Kearns or John Kearns, whichever one of them was the progenitor. In October 2019, Mike Kellis shared on the Irish Keeran Kearns Genealogy Research and DNA Group that he is descended from the Kearns through his mother. Her 4th great-grandfather was Isaac Kearns/Keerans. Her line goes to his daughter Hannah who married James Hall. They are from the Randolph/Montgomery County, NC, area. Maybe Hannah Kearns Hall is named for her alleged grandmother Hannah Miller Kearns, and if so, this would point to the progenitor being John Kearns instead of William T. Kearns.

Kearns Family Record,
which indicates William T. Kearns and Mary (King) Kearns as progenitors.

On 13 November 1760 Henry Ivey deeded 110 acres to his son John Ivey in Southampton County, described as part of George Wyche's patents sold to Henry Ivey. In 1764, John Ivey patented 161 acres just south of Ploughman's Creek, described in the patent as including part of two patents to George Wyche, obviously including the 110 acres given to him by his father four years earlier. This land can be matched to the land devised in the 1787 will of John Ivey Sr. A 1755 Southampton County court record perhaps establishes that his wife Mary was the daughter of David Adams. On 13 August 1761 he made bond as guardian of Lucy Adams, orphan of David Adams, with Joseph Prince his security. (A David Adams had patented land near Henry Ivey in 1746 and was apparently the David Adams whose inventory was ordered in what was then Isle of Wight in 1748. Whether Lucy was the child of the same David Adams is unclear, but he is the only David Adams mentioned in Southampton probate records.) John Ivey apparently had lived in Sussex County prior to 1760, although there is no record of him in the deed books, for the births of six children to John and Mary Ivey are recorded in the Albemarle parish register between 1746 and 1760. Benjamin and Elizabeth Adams served as sponsors of two of the children, Joseph Prince as sponsor of one, and the other listed godparents lived in Sussex. Presumably this is the same John and Mary Ivey, though only one of these children was later named in his will. By 1760 he was apparently living on the land given to him by his father just over the line in Southampton County, and was no longer in Albemarle parish."
Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird

John Ivey, Sr.
b. ca. 1725
d. 1789
m. Mary Adams  

Gene Kearns thinks he has possibly traced the Kearns line back to John Keirns (no dates) and his son William Thomas Mosson Keirns (1740 County Cork, Ireland-1825 Farmer, NC) and Mary Elizabeth Caroline King (1740 County Cork, Ireland-???? Farmer, NC). They were married in 1753 in Ireland. Until recently, things began with William Keirns (Kearns) the father of four boys: Isaac L. Kearns (Sr.), Silas Kearns, William Kearns, Jr. and Thomas Kearns; however, he may have discovered two more sons and a daughter: Jonathan (1761, County Cork, Ireland - 1850, WV), Susannah (1766, Isaac Sr.'s twin dying at or near childbirth) and Josiah (1771). As of September 2019, in correspondence with Sue Mulero and Gene Kearns, both indicate Gene Kearns has numerous DNA matches with people who descended from a Thomas Keeran/Kearns (1707-1796) born in Ireland and died in Chester PA. He has many lines descended from him and Gene has small matches on several branches. Mostly they migrated from PA to Va to WV to Ohio. There were a few who went elsewhere. Some say there was a "John Thomas" b. 1733 in PA and died in Randolph, NC. Sue found a will for a John in NC, but hasn't seen any proof that this John was born in PA.

↑ Read about the Kearns name and theories above ↑
or
↓ View the Kearns tree below ↓



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John Kearns

m.

Hannah Miller
  William T. Kearns, Sr. (Keerans)   Mary E. King Note on birthdates: Sue Keirns Mulero traveled to Ireland and wrote the following in regards to genealogist who worked at Epic Museum in Dublin: "[H]e said people really didn't pay attention to birthdates and didn't care much if their baby was 2 vs 3. He said the church kept a record of the baptism as it was in writing. They would estimate ages if someone was old enough to join the military but otherwise no one really cared about age. His point was to be flexible about accepting records of potential ancestors. He said if I found a record with the correct name and it was a few years different from what you expect, it still might be my ancestor."     |
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  John Reese

Note: Geni.com lists his wife as Mary Thorpe (b. 1735, Southampton Co., VA) and lists him as John Reese, Jr., with his parents as John and Mary Reese.
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  b. 1740?, Ireland
Note on birthdates above
d. 1826, Farmer, NC
m. 1753?
b. 1740?
Note on birthdates above
d. ?
One genealogy.com user indicates the parents of Silas, Isaac and Thomas and were John and Hannah Miller Kearns. Joy McNally-Kearns mentions a Kearns descendant from Georgia who had some papers, written in 1944 by someone doing genealogy research apparently on the Kearns family, found in the family bible, which mention William Kearns and Mary King.     |
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  b. ca. 1737, Southampton County, Virginia
d. 13 November 1794, Parish of St. Luke, Southampton, Virginia
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Parents?
See above.
John or Wm/Mary? |
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???
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Benjamin and Sally (Reese) Ivey: "On 19 January 1790, barely a month after his father's will was proved, Benjamin and his wife Sally sold his interest in the inherited plantation to his brother Phillips Ivey. He must have left the area almost immediately, for Benjamin does not appear in the 1790 tax list, compiled mainly in March and April that year. He and his wife are, however, named in the will of his father in law, John Reese, dated 1 December 1792 and proved on 9 October 1794. The will distributed the estate equally among ten of the Reese children, and gave five shillings each to three other daughters: "my beloved daughter Sally Ivy, wife of Benjamin Ivy", Sucky Ivy wife of Philip (sic) Ivy, and Lucy Johnson. Since he was apparently gone from Virginia by early 1790, he seems likely to be the same Benjamin Ivey who appears in the 1790 census of Randolph County, North Carolina. The 1800 census shows him with a household of eight. This Benjamin Ivey left a will dated 17 October [1801] and proved in August 1802, naming his wife Sally, daughters Rebecca Kearns, Betsy Nance, "Prisey", Sally, and Sukey (under 18), and sons Kinchen, Isaac, and Benjamin (under 21). Kinchen was left 200 acres, and the home plantation of 190 acres was given to Sally until her death or remarriage, when it was to fall to Isaac. Further indication that he may have been the same Benjamin Ivey from Southampton is that his son Benjamin Ivey named his own eldest son John Reese Ivey."
Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird

Benjamin Ivey
b. ca. 1760
d. 1802
m. 17 October 1782
Southampton County, VA
Sarah "Sally" Reese

Also seen as Sallie Reese; after Benjamin's death, she married Zedekiah (Zedediah) Ledbetter and so sometimes is listed as Sallie Ledbetter. She was not named Sallie Kincheon, which some sources erroneously list as genealogist Bob Baird doesn't believe that Kincheon is her surname. Source: Geni.com
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Cora REBECCA Webb
Gene Kearns suspects Langston is Isaac's middle name.

The 1826 probate document for Isaac's brother William Kearns mentions Isaac as guardian to his deceased brother William's minor heirs.
Isaac L. Kearns, Sr.   Thomas Kearns Life in 18th Century North Carolina prior to the Revolutionary War Rebecca Ivy (Ivey)
(photo source)
Click HERE to see a memorial stone of Thomas Kearns, which also lists his children. CAUTION: There is error on the stone. What I have listed on this page is as accurate as I have come up with based on the sources I have.
b. 27 May 1769
Randolph Co., NC
d. 27 May 1835
Uwharrie, Montgomery Co., NC
Buried in Uwharrie Friends Burial Ground
Asheboro
Randolph Co., NC
grave marker stone
m. ? b. 22 October 1766
Randolph Co., NC
d. 30 October 1844
Uwharrie, Montgomery Co., NC
Buried in Uwharrie Friends Burial Ground
Asheboro
Randolph Co., NC
grave marker stone
  b. 19 Jan. 1776
d. 12 November 1847
Concord Twp., Randolph Co., NC
m. ? b. 1 Jan. 1786
d. 11 May 1845
 
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their descendants through son John Crawford Kearns, Sr., via his marriage to Anna "Annie" Nance
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  According to Doug Kearns' (descendant of William T. Kearns' or John Kearns' son Silas -- brother to Thomas -- born 1767) files, he has a Thomas Carns in 1803 as purchasing or receiving land from the State (North Carolina). He also has Thomas Kerns in 1803 as purchasing land from a Richard Loflin. Both purchases were in Randolph County, North Carolina. I am not sure if this Thomas Carns is the Thomas Kearns on this page. --James A. Johnson
     
Allen Harris Johnson

("Harris")
  Elizabeth "Betsy" Kearns   Click HERE - picture with Allen & Elizabeth ("Harris" and "Betsy").
      b. 21 March 1817
d. 30 September 1905
Buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery, Randolph County, NC
m. 1836
Married young.
He was 18.
She was 15.
b. 29 Jan. 1821*
d. 21 July 1899*

Buried in Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery, Randolph County, NC
  *Note on dates:
21 March 1821-21 July 1899 are the dates provided for the life of Elizabeth "Betsy" Kearns by the FARMER (Zeb R. Denny, Ed.) book. 29 January 1821 - 22 July 1899 are given for Elizabeth on the memorial stone of her parents. See the memorial stone link (mentioned above -- Use caution as there is error). However, Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery, Randolph County, NC, shows 29 January 1821 - 21 July 1899.
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their
descendants through son Titus Winbourne Johnson via his marriage to Malinda Christine Campbell

Allen "Harris" Johnson (1817-1905) married Elizabeth "Betsy" Kearns (1821-1899). Among their children were my ancestor Titus "Winbourne" Johnson and Jeremiah W. Johnson. Jeremiah W. Johnson (1846-1922) married Elbie Stokes and they had one daughter: Emma Johnson who married Charlie Thompson and they, in turn, had 9 children. Source: FARMER: Yesterday and Today, p. 118.

Children of Allen "Harris" Johnson and Elizabeth "Betsy" (Kearns) Johnson: Titus Winbourne Johnson (1837-1913), Thomas Clark Johnson (1840-1922), John Hansell Johnson (1842-1919), Jeremiah W. Johnson (1845-1922), Clarinda Ellen Johnson Riley (1851-1904), Milton H. Johnson (1853-1900) and Louise Johnson Diffee (1859-1942) (Source: FindAGrave).

THE NAME KEARNS: 
Doug Kearns corresponded with a William Kearns of Liverpool, England, who
advised that the Irish Gaelic Language does not contain a "K" and "C"
takes the place of the "K", as in Carns, Currins, Currans.  I have
also seen the name Cairn, but am unsure if Kearns and it are related.
                                                 
Still, there is another possibility according to Doug Kearns.
In Switzerland, there is a little town named KERNS that dates back to
1200 AD.  He had read a book about the Amish who were persecuted
because of their strict religious ways.  They began in Switzerland
and slowly made their way up the Rhine River to Holland where they
boarded boats for the New World.  There are numerous Kerns in
Germany.  Thousands of Germans migrated to Ireland during the
late 1600's and early 1700's. They probably didn't find what they
expected and when the opportunity was right they jumped on a boat
to America.  So the name may bring in an ancestry of Irish, German,
and Swiss heritage.  Whether or not Kerns and Kearns are related
is uncertain, though.  

According to the book FARMER: Yesterday and Today (Zeb R. Denny, editor;
published by Wooten Printing Co., Inc. in Welcome, NC), William T. and
Mary King Kearns came to America from Ireland between 1760 and 1765,
changing the name KEERANS to KEARNS.  He settled on Second Creek, North
Carolina, just 3 miles south of Farmer, NC, in Concord Township
(Randolph Co.).  The FARMER book lists William T. Kearns, Sr., and
Mary King (Mary King Kearns) as the parents of Thomas Kearns, husband
of Rebecca Ivy. The tombstone shown when clicking on the link below
states that John Kearns is the father of Thomas Kearns, husband of
Rebecca Ivey. Documentation supports John as the father of Thomas and
likely Isaac and Silas.  John was in Rowan (now Randolph Co., NC) in
1768 as a taxpayer.  Much of this information comes from Doug Kearns.
However, according to a page in a biography, William is the father according to Thom Cameron. 

William T.    Mary     Adam A. 
Kearns, Sr. + King      Ivey
(Keerans)                 |
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+------+-----+         Benjamin
|            |          Ivey
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Isaac        Thomas +  Rebecca          Click HERE to see the 
Kearns       Kearns |  Ivy (Ivey)       tombstone of Thomas 
    +    +----------+----------------+  Kearns and Rebecca Ivey
Rebecca  |b. 19 Jan.| b. 1 Jan. 1786 |  Kearns which also lists
  Webb   |   1776   | d. 11 May 1845 |  their children.
    |    |d. 1847   |                |
    |    +----------+----------------+
    ↓               |   According to Doug Kearns'
   their            |   (descendant of William T. Kearns' or John
descendants         |   Kearns' son Silas -- brother to Thomas --
                    |   born 1767) files, he has a Thomas Carns in
                    |   1803 as purchasing or receiving land from the
                    |   State (North Carolina). He also has Thomas
                    |   Kerns in 1803 as purchasing land from a
                    |   Richard Loflin. Both purchases were in Randolph
                    |   County, North Carolina. I am not sure if this
                    |   Thomas Carns is the Thomas Kearns on this page.
                    |                   --James A. Johnson
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     Allen       Elizabeth
     Harris      "Betsy"
     Johnson  +  Kearns   Click HERE - picture w/ Allen & Elizabeth.
              |
          +---+---+-----+
          |m. 1836|b. 29| 21 March 1821-21 July 1899 are the dates  
          |Married| Jan.| provided for the life of Elizabeth "Betsy"
          |young: |1821 | Kearns by the FARMER (Zeb R. Denny,
          |He was |d. 22| Ed.) book.  The dates to the left are   
          |18. She|July | given for Elizabeth on the tombstone of 
          |was 15.|1899 | her parents.  See the tombstone link above.
          +---+---+-----+