Kearns (Keerans) and Ivey (Ivy) Ancestry

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KEARNS

The name Kearns:

Doug Kearns corresponded with a William Kearns of Liverpool, England, who advised that the Irish Gaelic Language does not contain a "K" and "C" takes the place of the "K", as in Carns, Currins, Currans. I have also seen the name Cairn(s). However, according to Ancestry.com, Kearns is the "Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Céirín 'descendant of Céirín', a personal name from a diminutive of ciar 'dark', 'black'. English patronymic -s has been added superfluously" and a variant of the Irish Carnes.

Adam Ivey, Sr.
b. ca. 1640s
d. by 1710
Appears to have immigrated to Charles City Co., VA, in the 1670s. He was likely a small-scale tenant tobacco farmer.

m.

Elizabeth
of Prince George Co. and Weyanoke Parish
d. ca. 1720
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IVEY


Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird
   
Richard Sledge
b. March 1607, Batcombe, Somerset, England
d. 1699 in England
Mary Cole
b. 1609, Batcombe, Somerset, England
d. 1672
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Richard Sledge
b. October 19, 1634, Somerset, England
m. to Ann (maiden name unknown)
d. 1725 in Virginia

Source: Geni.com
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Katherine Flake

b. 1631, Virginia
d. 1722, Virginia

Sources: Geni.com and Ancestry.com
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Robert Clark (Clarke)

b. 1631, England, United Kingdom
d. 1673, Surry, Surry County, Virginia

Sources: Geni.com and Ancestry.com
Elizabeth Flake

b. 1659 (Appears to be a wrong date given daughter's birth date), Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight County, Virginia
d. 1717, Surry, Surry County, Virginia

Sources: Geni.com and Ancestry.com
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  George Ivey
b. ca. 1670
d. after 1737
Lived in Prince George Co., VA
m. Ruth   Charles Sledge
b. 1650, Shropshire, England
d. 1727, Surry, Virginia
m. Mary Rebecca Clark (Clarke)
b. 1652, Isle of Wight, Virginia
d. 1728, Surry, Virginia

Still, there is another possibility according to Doug Kearns. In Switzerland, there is a little town named KERNS that dates back to 1200 AD. He had read a book about the Amish who were persecuted because of their strict religious ways. They began in Switzerland and slowly made their way up the Rhine River to Holland where they boarded boats for the New World. There are numerous Kerns in Germany. Thousands of Germans migrated to Ireland during the late 1600's and early 1700's. They probably didn't find what they expected and when the opportunity was right they jumped on a boat to America. So the name may bring in an ancestry of Irish, German, and Swiss heritage. Whether or not Kerns and Kearns are related is uncertain, though.

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    The 1725 will of Charles Sledge leaves a yearling heifer to "my daughter Rebecca Ivy". (Charles Sledge was by then living on his patents on Pigeon Swamp near John Ivey in what would later be Sussex County.) Charles Sledge's widow, Mary Sledge, made her own will on 8 January 1727, bequeathing a breeding cow to her daughter "Rebecca Ivie". Her will was witnessed by Edward and Elizabeth Prince, possibly the daughter and son-in-law of Adam Ivey, and her son-in-law Peter Hay was executor. Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird |
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Henry Ivey, Sr.
b. ca. 1695
d. 1774, Southampton Co., VA
m. ca. 1725 Rebecca Sledge
b. circa 1700 Surry County, Virginia
d. between 1738 and 1765, Southampton County, Virginia

According to Ancestry.com in referring to the Dictionary of American Family Names (© 2013, Oxford University Press), the Kearns name meaning is Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Céirín 'descendant of Céirín', a personal name from a diminutive of ciar 'dark', 'black'. English patronymic -s has been added superfluously.

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"These [deed/land] records are vital to differentiating this Henry Ivey from his cousin of the same name. First, they establish that it was Henry Ivey, the son of George Ivey, who lived in Southampton County and died there in 1774. Second, they tell us that this Henry Ivey, son of George, consistently signed his name to documents, in contrast to his first cousin who signed with a mark. That, and the Sledge connection, means he is virtually certain to be the same Henry Ivey who signed his name as a witness to the will of Samuel Clark on 12 June 1736 in what was then Brunswick County. This Samuel Clark was the brother of Mary Clark Sledge, wife of Charles Sledge, and therefore the uncle of Henry Ivey's wife. It seems clear that Henry Ivey was married to Rebecca Sledge, son of Charles and Mary Sledge. The long-accepted theory is that his uncle, also named Henry Ivey, was the husband of Rebecca Sledge. However, we know that Rebecca Sledge's brother John was not born until about 1700, thus she was likely much too young to have been the wife of a second-generation Ivey and mother of third-generation Iveys . Further, we know this Henry Ivey was married to a wife named Rebecca in 1737, when he lived quite close to Rebecca Sledge's parents, while the name of his uncle's wife appears in no records" (Baird, pp. 11-12).
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David Adams
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Original Kearns Mystery

According to the book FARMER: Yesterday and Today (Zeb R. Denny, editor; published by Wooten Printing Co., Inc. in Welcome, NC), William T. and Mary King Kearns came to America from Ireland between 1760 and 1765, changing the name KEERANS to KEARNS. He settled on Second Creek, North Carolina, just 3 miles south of Farmer, NC, in Concord Township (Randolph Co.). The FARMER book lists William T. Kearns, Sr., and Mary King (Mary King Kearns) as the parents of Thomas Kearns, husband of Rebecca Ivy. The tombstone of Thomas Kearns states that John Kearns is the father of Thomas Kearns, husband of Rebecca Ivey. Some documentation supports John as the father of Thomas and likely Isaac and Silas. John was in Rowan (now Randolph Co., NC) in 1768 as a taxpayer. Much of this information comes from Doug Kearns in 2005. According to a page in a biography, William is the father (source provided by Thom Cameron - descendant of James Cameron and Mary "Polly" Kearns Cameron -- via correspondence in 2013). However, Thom Cameron has found a John Kearns in 1762 in Rowan County, NC (could be the area of now Davidson County). Thom pointed out where the first child of Mary King named is Jonathan Kearns (1761-1850), which is the traditional naming pattern if the father is John or Jonathan, but we cannot be certain because William T. Kearns' first son with his first wife Catherine Hotzenbella (1742-1776) was Nicholas Kearns, which does not follow the traditional naming pattern (i.e., the Jonathan does not imply the father was named John or Jonathan).

Kearns Family Record

On 13 November 1760 Henry Ivey deeded 110 acres to his son John Ivey in Southampton County, described as part of George Wyche's patents sold to Henry Ivey. In 1764, John Ivey patented 161 acres just south of Ploughman's Creek, described in the patent as including part of two patents to George Wyche, obviously including the 110 acres given to him by his father four years earlier. This land can be matched to the land devised in the 1787 will of John Ivey Sr. A 1755 Southampton County court record perhaps establishes that his wife Mary was the daughter of David Adams. On 13 August 1761 he made bond as guardian of Lucy Adams, orphan of David Adams, with Joseph Prince his security. (A David Adams had patented land near Henry Ivey in 1746 and was apparently the David Adams whose inventory was ordered in what was then Isle of Wight in 1748. Whether Lucy was the child of the same David Adams is unclear, but he is the only David Adams mentioned in Southampton probate records.) John Ivey apparently had lived in Sussex County prior to 1760, although there is no record of him in the deed books, for the births of six children to John and Mary Ivey are recorded in the Albemarle parish register between 1746 and 1760. Benjamin and Elizabeth Adams served as sponsors of two of the children, Joseph Prince as sponsor of one, and the other listed godparents lived in Sussex. Presumably this is the same John and Mary Ivey, though only one of these children was later named in his will. By 1760 he was apparently living on the land given to him by his father just over the line in Southampton County, and was no longer in Albemarle parish."
Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird

John Ivey, Sr.
b. ca. 1725
d. 1789
m. Mary Adams  
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John Kearns   William T. Kearns, Sr. (Keerans)   Mary E. King         |
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  John Reese
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  b. 1740, Ireland
d. 1826, Farmer, NC
m. 1753
He was only 13
b. 1740
d. ?
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  b. ?
d. ca. 1794
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Parents?
See above.
John or Wm/Mary? |
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???
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Benjamin and Sally (Reese) Ivey: "On 19 January 1790, barely a month after his father's will was proved, Benjamin and his wife Sally sold his interest in the inherited plantation to his brother Phillips Ivey. He must have left the area almost immediately, for Benjamin does not appear in the 1790 tax list, compiled mainly in March and April that year. He and his wife are, however, named in the will of his father in law, John Reese, dated 1 December 1792 and proved on 9 October 1794. The will distributed the estate equally among ten of the Reese children, and gave five shillings each to three other daughters: "my beloved daughter Sally Ivy, wife of Benjamin Ivy", Sucky Ivy wife of Philip (sic) Ivy, and Lucy Johnson. Since he was apparently gone from Virginia by early 1790, he seems likely to be the same Benjamin Ivey who appears in the 1790 census of Randolph County, North Carolina. The 1800 census shows him with a household of eight. This Benjamin Ivey left a will dated 17 October [1801] and proved in August 1802, naming his wife Sally, daughters Rebecca Kearns, Betsy Nance, "Prisey", Sally, and Sukey (under 18), and sons Kinchen, Isaac, and Benjamin (under 21). Kinchen was left 200 acres, and the home plantation of 190 acres was given to Sally until her death or remarriage, when it was to fall to Isaac. Further indication that he may have been the same Benjamin Ivey from Southampton is that his son Benjamin Ivey named his own eldest son John Reese Ivey."
Source: The Line of Adam Ivey of Charles City County by Robert W. Baird

Benjamin Ivey
b. ca. 1760
d. 1802
m. 17 October 1782
Southampton County, VA
Sarah "Sally" Reese

Also seen as Sallie Reese; after Benjamin's death, she married Zedekiah (Zedediah) Ledbetter and so sometimes is listed as Sallie Ledbetter. She was not named Sallie Kincheon, which some sources erroneously list as genealogist Bob Baird doesn't believe that Kincheon is her surname. Source: Geni.com
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Cora REBECCA Webb
  Isaac L. Kearns, Sr.   Thomas Kearns           Rebecca Ivy (Ivey) Click HERE to see the tombstone of Thomas Kearns, which also lists his children.
b. 27 May 1769
Randolph Co., NC
d. 27 May 1835
Uwharrie, Montgomery Co., NC
Buried in Uwharrie Friends Burial Ground
Asheboro
Randolph Co., NC
grave marker stone
m. ? b. 22 October 1766
Randolph Co., NC
d. 30 October 1844
Uwharrie, Montgomery Co., NC
Buried in Uwharrie Friends Burial Ground
Asheboro
Randolph Co., NC
grave marker stone
  b. 19 Jan. 1776
d. 1847
m. ? b. 1 Jan. 1786
d. 11 May 1845
 
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their descendants
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  According to Doug Kearns' (descendant of William T. Kearns' or John Kearns' son Silas -- brother to Thomas -- born 1767) files, he has a Thomas Carns in 1803 as purchasing or receiving land from the State (North Carolina). He also has Thomas Kerns in 1803 as purchasing land from a Richard Loflin. Both purchases were in Randolph County, North Carolina. I am not sure if this Thomas Carns is the Thomas Kearns on this page. --James A. Johnson
     
Allen Harris Johnson

("Harris")
  Elizabeth "Betsy" Kearns   Click HERE - picture with Allen & Elizabeth ("Harris" and "Betsy").
      b. 21 March 1817
d. 30 September 1905
m. 1836
Married young.
He was 18.
She was 15.
b. 29 Jan. 1821*
d. 22 July 1899*
  *Note on dates:
21 March 1821-21 July 1899 are the dates provided for the life of Elizabeth "Betsy" Kearns by the FARMER (Zeb R. Denny, Ed.) book. The dates to the left are given for Elizabeth on the tombstone of her parents. See the tombstone link (mentioned above).
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their
descendants
     
THE NAME KEARNS: 
Doug Kearns corresponded with a William Kearns of Liverpool, England, who
advised that the Irish Gaelic Language does not contain a "K" and "C"
takes the place of the "K", as in Carns, Currins, Currans.  I have
also seen the name Cairn, but am unsure if Kearns and it are related.
                                                 
Still, there is another possibility according to Doug Kearns.
In Switzerland, there is a little town named KERNS that dates back to
1200 AD.  He had read a book about the Amish who were persecuted
because of their strict religious ways.  They began in Switzerland
and slowly made their way up the Rhine River to Holland where they
boarded boats for the New World.  There are numerous Kerns in
Germany.  Thousands of Germans migrated to Ireland during the
late 1600's and early 1700's. They probably didn't find what they
expected and when the opportunity was right they jumped on a boat
to America.  So the name may bring in an ancestry of Irish, German,
and Swiss heritage.  Whether or not Kerns and Kearns are related
is uncertain, though.  

According to the book FARMER: Yesterday and Today (Zeb R. Denny, editor;
published by Wooten Printing Co., Inc. in Welcome, NC), William T. and
Mary King Kearns came to America from Ireland between 1760 and 1765,
changing the name KEERANS to KEARNS.  He settled on Second Creek, North
Carolina, just 3 miles south of Farmer, NC, in Concord Township
(Randolph Co.).  The FARMER book lists William T. Kearns, Sr., and
Mary King (Mary King Kearns) as the parents of Thomas Kearns, husband
of Rebecca Ivy. The tombstone shown when clicking on the link below
states that John Kearns is the father of Thomas Kearns, husband of
Rebecca Ivey. Documentation supports John as the father of Thomas and
likely Isaac and Silas.  John was in Rowan (now Randolph Co., NC) in
1768 as a taxpayer.  Much of this information comes from Doug Kearns.
However, according to a page in a biography, William is the father according to Thom Cameron. 

William T.    Mary     Adam A. 
Kearns, Sr. + King      Ivey
(Keerans)                 |
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+------+-----+         Benjamin
|            |          Ivey
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Isaac        Thomas +  Rebecca          Click HERE to see the 
Kearns       Kearns |  Ivy (Ivey)       tombstone of Thomas 
    +    +----------+----------------+  Kearns and Rebecca Ivey
Rebecca  |b. 19 Jan.| b. 1 Jan. 1786 |  Kearns which also lists
  Webb   |   1776   | d. 11 May 1845 |  their children.
    |    |d. 1847   |                |
    |    +----------+----------------+
    ↓               |   According to Doug Kearns'
   their            |   (descendant of William T. Kearns' or John
descendants         |   Kearns' son Silas -- brother to Thomas --
                    |   born 1767) files, he has a Thomas Carns in
                    |   1803 as purchasing or receiving land from the
                    |   State (North Carolina). He also has Thomas
                    |   Kerns in 1803 as purchasing land from a
                    |   Richard Loflin. Both purchases were in Randolph
                    |   County, North Carolina. I am not sure if this
                    |   Thomas Carns is the Thomas Kearns on this page.
                    |                   --James A. Johnson
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     Allen       Elizabeth
     Harris      "Betsy"
     Johnson  +  Kearns   Click HERE - picture w/ Allen & Elizabeth.
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          +---+---+-----+
          |m. 1836|b. 29| 21 March 1821-21 July 1899 are the dates  
          |Married| Jan.| provided for the life of Elizabeth "Betsy"
          |young: |1821 | Kearns by the FARMER (Zeb R. Denny,
          |He was |d. 22| Ed.) book.  The dates to the left are   
          |18. She|July | given for Elizabeth on the tombstone of 
          |was 15.|1899 | her parents.  See the tombstone link above.
          +---+---+-----+