de Braiose (de Braose / Braose) Ancestry

Sources: http://www.culpepperconnections.com/ss/p37323.htm and pages thereof, http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pmcbride/genweb.html#james (made accessible online by Paul B. McBride) and pages thereof, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Fitz_Richard and pages there of, and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diarmait_Mac_Murchada and pages thereof.

(click names to see a related article.)

Images used are public domain unless otherwise specified.

!!! NOTE !!! Per Culpeper ancestral reasearch, the following ancestries remain unproven: the Malet, Poyntz, Beaumont, Vermandois, Anjou, Kievan ancestry, Byzantine ancestry, Viking ancestry, de Braiose, La Zouche, ancestry to kings of Leinster, legendary Irish ancestry and ancestry to the kings of Wales and Mercia and all the ancestries thereof.

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The baronial family of Braose came from originally from Briouze, near Argentan, Normandy. William de Briouse was one of the most powerful barons in William the Conqueror's army. He received large possessions, chiefly in Sussex, including the whole Rape of Bramber, where he built Bramber Castle, which was his seat. In 1075 he executed the foundation charter of the Sele Abbey, Sussex, founded the Abbey of Braiose in the time of William I. and made grants to St. Florent Saumer. Gunnora, his mother, in 1082 held lands from Hugh Pincera and Roger de Cuilli. The date of his death is unknown, but he was succeeded by his son, Philip de Briouse, during the reign of William Rufus; he increased the vast estates of his father by marriage with Beta, sister and co-heir of William, Earl of Gloucester. He is mentioned by Oderic Vital in 1096 as supporting William Rufus against his brother Henry, who held the strong castle of Domfront in Normandy, from which he carried on his operations. Philip was the ancestor of the house of Braose, barons of Bramber, Brecknock, Gower, and Totness, and of William de Braose, who obtained from King Henry II. a grant of the "whole kingdom of Limerick" in Ireland for the service of sixty knight's fees. Numerous branches existed also in Sussex, Bedford, Hampshire, Norfolk, Suffolk, Wales, and from him descended also the Wingfields, Viscounts Powerscourt. The family must not be confused with that of Brius, Bris, or Brix, of which Robert de Brix was the representative at Hastings. (Reference: Crispin and Macary). Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James

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Ancestry


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Ancestry


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                            Turketil of Neufmarché
b.
d.
  Her ancestors founded the town of Aufay south of Dieppe on the Scie and she is descended from Richard II of Normandy (source).       Gruffydd ap Llywelyn,
King of Wales

b.
d. 1063
killed by his own men
m. Ealdgyth
(Aldgyth, Edith)

flourished 1057 - 1066
                                                             
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Drago (Dru) de Ballon
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                              Geoffrey de Neufmarché
He is described as a "minor and incompetent Norman baron" (source)
m. Ada de Hugleville     Osbern fitz Richard m. Nest ferch Gruffydd,
a Welsh princess
(Related article about son-in-law mentioning her lineage)
Nest had also been married to Trahaearn ap Caradog and had children with him. Those descendants (who are also in my ancestry) can be seen in the Owain - Madog Ancestry
                      All that is known of Aveline's parentage is that she belonged to a family who had settled in the Pays de Caux. Robert of Torigni wrote she was a forester's daughter from the Pays de Caux and according to Dudo of Saint-Quentin she was of noble Danish origin. Her family held sway in western Normandy. (Source: Wikipedia.)
Aveline
(Wevia/Weva),
sister of Gunnora, Duchess of Normandy.
m.
                 
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Roger de Pitres
(de Pistri)
,
a Norman from Pîtres, Eure, canton of Pont-de-l'Arche, Sheriff of Gloucester under William the Conqueror and constable of Gloucester Castle
d. before 1083
m. Eunice de Balun (de Ballon)
Some records have Adeliza
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Gerard Flaitel was a Norman baron with substantial estates in the Pays de Caux, the Hiemois, the Evrecin and Risle valley. He was a vassal of William of Talou in Arques. In 1035, when Robert I, Duke of Normandy left on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, Gerard Flaitel was one of his companions. In the spring of 1035 the group left Normandy probably taking the favored route through the Danube river basin to Constantinople. Duke Robert obtained permission for him and his retinue to continue on to Muslim-controlled Jerusalem. In Turkey Robert paid the required mussella (pilgrim tax).[3] They arrived in time to spend Holy Week in Jerusalem. On their return through Asia Minor, Duke Robert fell ill while they were in Nicaea, and died there about 2 July. As he lay dying Gerard was asked to take possession of a Holy relic Robert acquired in Jerusalem, reputedly a finger-bone of Saint Stephen, and to make a gift of it to the abbey or monastery of his choosing. Gerard returned to Normandy and became a monk at the Abbey of St. Wandrille taking the relic with him. He died after 1047. Source: Wikipedia.
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Eve de Boissey

or

Agnes de St. Clare
William came to England with William the Conqueror, and held at the General Survey considerable estates in the counties of Berks, Surrey, Dorset, and Sussex (source).
 
Alfred
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a son of Drago (possibly Drago's son Wynoc?)
de Ballon
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  Bernard de Neufmarché,
Lord of Brecon

b. ca. 1050
at the castle of Le-Neuf-Marché-en-Lions on the frontier between Normandy and Beauvais
d. ca. 1125
m. before 1099 Agnes (Nest) ferch Osbern      
Ancestry
through father Gislebert,
Count of Eu and Brionne
(a.k.a. Gilbert, Count of Brionne) and mother Gonnor
 
Walter (Gautier) Giffard de Bolebec,
Earl of Buckingham and Earl of Longueville, in Normandy
b.
m.
Ermengarde (Agnes) Flaitel
Walter (Gautier) Giffard de Bolebec was brother of Berenger and Osberne (Osborne), who contributed 30 vessels and 100 men to the fleet for the Conquest as well as the horse on which William the Conqueror rode at the Battle of Hastings. He was awarded the earldom of Buckingham for his services. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James. Walter "was a Norman baron, a Tenant-in-chief in England, a Christian knight who fought against the Saracens in Spain during the Reconquista and was one of the 15 or so known Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066" (Wikipedia).
           
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  Walter of Gloucester
(Walter FitzRoger,
Walter de Pitres)

d. ca. 1129
Earlest to use "of Gloucester" in his family. He received lands from his cousin Brien FitzCount (son of Lucie de Balun, sister of Hamelin de Ballon) after Brien died in the Crusade
m. Bertha de Balun (de Ballon)           |
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            Ancestry through parents Eblo I, Count of Rouci and Reimes (Ebles I of Roucy) and his wife Beatrix

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Philip de Braose,
2nd Lord of Bramber
,
an Anglo-Norman nobleman and Marcher Lord.
b. ca. 1070
d. ca. 1134
Also see this info.
m. Aenor     |
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Richard Fitzgilbert of Tonebruge, a lawyer and Chief Justice of England, born before 1035, was the founder of the House of Clare in England, first Lord of Clare. He was the eldest son of Gislebert, Count of Eu and Brionne, a descendant of Emperor Charlemagne. He accompanied Duke William into England, and later held one hundred and seventy-six lordships or manors. At the time of the General Survey, which was towards the close of King William's reign, he is called Ricardus de Tonebruge, from his seat at Tonebruge (now Tunbridge), in Kent, which town and castle he obtained from the archbishop of Canterbury, in lieu of the castle of Brion; at which time he enjoyed thirty-eight lordships in Surrey, thirty-five in Essex, three in Cambridgeshire, with some others in Wilts and Devon, and ninety-five in Suffolk, among those was Clare, whence he was styled Richard de Clare; and that place in a few years afterwards becoming the chief seat of the family, his descendants are said to have assumed thereupon the title of Earls of Clare (Burke, pg. 118-119). He married Rohese Giffard of Bolebec, daughter of Walter (Gautier) Giffard de Bolebec, Earl of Buckingham and Earl of Longueville, in Normandy, granddaughter of Osborne de Bolebec, a noble Norman, living in the time of Richard, Duke of Normandy, and granddaughter of his wife, Aveline, sister of Gunnora, Duchess of Normandy. According to Burke, pp. 230-231, he was granted for his gallant services at the battle of Hastings, the title of Earl of Buckingham. At the time of the General Survey, he was sent with Remigius, Bishop of Lincoln, and others, into Worcestershire, and some other counties, to value the lands belonging to the crown, as well as to private individuals in these parts. He himself possessed at that time two lordships in Berkshire; one in Wilts; one in Somersetshire; one in Huntingdon; five in Cambridgeshire; nine in Oxfordshire; nine in the co. of Bedford; three in Suffolk; twenty-eight in Norfolk; an forty-eight in Buckinghamshire; in all one hundred and seven. In 1089, he adhering to William Rufus, fortified his mansions in Normandy, for that king, and became chief general of his army there; yet in some years afterwards (1102), he sided with Robert Curthose (Courthouse), against King Henry I. The earl married Agnes Flaitell, daughter of Gerard Flaitell, and sister of William Flaitell, Bishop of Eureux. They had three children: Walter, his successor, 2nd Earl of Buckingham, who d.s.p; Rohais (Rohese), named above; and Isabel Giffard, who married Richard Granville or Grenville, progenitor of the house of Grenville, Dukes of Buckingham. According to Crispin and Macary, "Falaise Roll" pg. 22, Rohese was the daughter of Walter (Gautier) Giffard, brother of Berenger and Osberne (Osborne), who contributed 30 vessels and 100 men to the fleet for the Conquest as well as the horse on which William the Conqueror rode at the Battle of Hastings. He was awarded the earldom of Buckingham for his services. "Rohesia married Richard de Bienfaite, eldest son of Gilbert, Count of Brionne, from which union sprung the great house of Clare.")
Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James
Richard Fitzgilbert of Tonebruge
b. before 1035
d. 1090
Related information
m. Rohese Giffard of Bolebec   Hugh de Clermont,
2nd Count of Clermont
m. Margaret de Roucy
(Marguerita de Rouci)
           
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    Miles (Milo) FitzWalter de Gloucester,
Earl of Hereford,
Lord of Brecknock,
High Sherriff of Gloucester,
Constable of England

d. 24 December 1143
m. 1121 Sibyl de Neufmarché,
Countess of Hereford

b. ca. 1100
Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales
d. after 1143
Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucester, England
Buried in Llanthony Secunda Priory
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  Reginald de St. Valéry
d. ca. 1162
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William de Braose,
3rd Lord of Bramber

b.
flourished 1135-1179
d.
Also see this info.
m. by 1150 Bertha (Berta) of Hereford
(Bertha de Pitres)

b. ca. 11130
d.
Also refer to this info.
  Bernard de St. Valéry of Hinton Waldrist in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire)
b.
d.
m. Matilda
b.
d.
                                        Gilbert de Clare of Tonebruge resided at Tonebruge and inherited all of his father's lands in England. He joined in the rebellion of Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland, against the king, but observing the William Rufus upon the point of falling into an ambuscade, he relented, besought pardon, and saved his royal master. We find him subsequently, however, again in rebellion, in the same reign, and fortifying and losing his castle at Tunbridge. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homber Beers James Gilbert de Clare of Tonebruge
a.k.a. Gilbert FitzRichard,
2nd Earl of Clare,

b. before 1066
d. ca. 1117
Also see this information.
m. ca. 1088 Adeliza de Clermont
a.k.a. Alice Claremont

b.
d.
 
Ancestry through parents Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, and Elizabeth (Isabel) de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester
  Ancestry - Kings of Leinster, Ireland
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descendants through daughter Sybil de Braose via her marriage to Walkelin (William) De Ferrers |
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William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, inherited the large estates, and besides possessed of the honor of Braose, in Normandy. This feudal lord was a personage of great power and influence during the reigns of King Henry II. and King Richard I, from the former of whom he received a grant of the "whole kingdom of Limerick, in Ireland," for the service of sixty knight's fees, to be held of the king and his younger son, John. For several years after this period he appears to have enjoy the favor of King John, and his power and possessions were augmented by divers grants from the crown. But in the 10th year of the king's reign, when the kingdom labored under an interdiction, and John deemed it expedient to demand hostages from his barons to ensure their allegiance, should the Pope proceed to the length of absolving them from obedience to the crown, his officers who came upon the mission to the Baron de Braose, were sent by Maud, his wife, and peremptorily informed that she would not intrust any of her children to the king, who had so basely murdered his own nephew, Prince Arthur. De Braose rebuked her, however, for speaking thus, and said that if he had in any way offended the king, he was ready to make satisfaction, according to the judgment of the court, and the barons his peers, upon an appointed day, and at any fixed place, without however giving hostages. This answer being communicated to the king, an order was immediately transmitted to seize upon the baron's person, but Braose having notice thereof fled with his family to Ireland. This quarrel between the king and Braose is, however, differently related by other authorities. The monk of Lanthony states, that King John disinherited and banished him for his cruelty to the Welsh, in his war with Gwenwynwyn, and that his wife, Maud, and William, his son and heir, died prisoners in Corfe Castle. While another writer relates, "that this William de Braose, son of Philip de Braose, Lord of Buelt, held the lands of Brechnock and Went, for the whole time of King Henry II., King Richard I., and King John, without any disturbance, until he took to wife the Lady Maud de Walerie, who in revenge of Henry de Hereford, caused divers Welshmen to be murthered in the castle of Bergavenny, as they sat at meat; and that for this, and for some other pickt quarrel, King John banished him and all his out of England. Likewise, that in his exile, Maud, his wife, with William, called Gam, his son, were taken and put in prison; where she died, the 10th year after her husband fought with Wenwynwyn, and slew three thousand Welsh." From these various relations, says Dugdale, it is no easy matter to discover what his demerits were; but what usage he had at last, take here from the credit of these two historians, who lived near that time. "This year, viz. anno 1240," qouth Matthew of Westminster, "the noble lady Maud, wife of William de Braose, with William, their son and heir, were miserably famished at Windsore, by the command of King John. ; and William, her husband, escaping from Scorham, put himself into the habit of a beggar, and privately going beyond the sea, died soon after at Paris, where he had burial in the abbey of St, Victor." And Matthew Paris, putting his death in the year 1212 (which differs a little in time), says, "That he fled from Ireland to France, and dying at Ebula, his body was carried to Paris, and there honorably buried in the abbey of St. Victor....Being by inheritance from his mother, Lord of Bergavenny, he made grants to the monks of that priory, conditionally, that the abbot and convent of St. Vincenti, in Maine should daily pray for the soul of Maud his wife." Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James.
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William de Braose,
4th Lord of Bramber

b. 1144-1153
d. 9 August 1211
a fugitive of King John, though a former favorite.
m. ca. 1166 Maud de St. Valéry
a.k.a.
Lady Maud de Walerie, Matilda de Braose, Moll Wallbee, and Lady of La Haie

b. ca. 1155
d. 1210
After imprisonment in both Castle Windsor and Castle Corfe at the hands of King John, she perished by starvation with her oldest son William in the latter of the two castle. Sources: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James and Wikipedia. Also refer to http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pmcbride/james/f026.htm#I1309X1
        The earliest notice of the Marshal family occurs in the time of Henry I., when Gilbert Mareschall, and John, his son, were impleaded by Robert de Venoiz, and William de Hastings, for the office of Mareschel to the king, but without success. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James Gilbert Mareschall,
Royal Sergeant and Marshal to Henry I
b.
d. 1129
m. Margaret
b.
d.
      Walter and Sibilla were also parents of Patrick, 1st earl of sanctuary.
Patrick of Chaources
(source)
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Sibilla de Chaworth
(Sybil of Chaources)
m.
      Descendants through son Richard De Clare via his marriage to Alice (Adeliza) De Meschines Gilbert de Clare
(Gilbert fitz Gilbert de Clare
nicknamed "Strongbow")

created 1st Earl of Pembroke, in the year 1138

b. ca. 1100
d. 6 January 1148
Also see this information.
m. Isabel de Beaumont
b. after 1102
d.
She had been a mistress to King Henry I of England.
  Diarmait Mac Murchada
(Diarmaid Mac Murchadha, Dermot MacMurrough, Dermod MacMurrough, Dermont MacMurrough)
, King of Leinster, Ireland


b. ca. 1110
Leinster, Ireland
d. 1 May 1171
Ferns, County Wexford
Known as the man who invited the English into Ireland, he sought the aid of Richard de Clare against Roderick, King of Connaught, and in 1270 gave him his daughter Eva in Marriage (source).
Related: Irish Information article
m. ca. 1140
Loch Garman, County Wexford
Mór Ní Tuathail
(Mor O'Toole)

b. ca. 1114
Castledermot, County Kildare, Ireland
d. 1191
Ireland
 
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          William de Bruere   John Mareschall
(John FitzGilbert the Marshal of the Horses)

b. ca. 1105
d. 1165
John Mareschall (bearing the same surname, derived from his office), attached himself to the fortunes of Maud, against King Stephen, was with Robert, the consul, Earl of Gloucester., at the siege of the Winchester Castle, when the party of the empress sustained so signal a defeat. Upon the accession of Henry II., however, his fidelity was amply rewarded by considerable grants in co. Wilts; and in the 10th year of that reign, being then marshal, he laid claim, for the crown, to one of the manors of the see of Canterbury, from the celebrated prelate, Thomas a Becket, who about that period had commenced his contest with the king. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James
m. Sibyl of Salisbury     Richard de Clare was the 2nd Earl of Clare and the 2nd Earl of Pembroke, a statesman of renown. He "died untimely upon the nones of April, anno 1176." He was buried in the Cathedral Church of Dublin, where his effigy and that of his wife may be seen. Strongbow drove Roderick out of Waterford and Dublin, whereupon King Henry II. through jealousy deprived him of all his titles and he kept only Kildare, but was later reinstated in Leinster. He was later made Justice of Ireland, which he had helped to conquer. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James Richard de Clare
(surnamed Strongbow)
,
Earl of Pembroke, conqueror of Ireland and Justice of Ireland

(Richard de Clare "Strongbow" seal)

b. 1130
d. 20 April 1176
Related:
Irish Information article.
Also see this information.
m. Aoife MacMurrough (Eva McMurrough) of Leinster
b.
d. 1177
Eva McMurrough was descended from King Oilliol, who died in 526.
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    Reginald had his grant confirmed by King Henry III., and he had livery of the castle and honor of Totness, with the honor of Barnstaple, having had previous possession of other estates. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James Reginald de Braose
b.
d. 1227-1228
He was a witness to the re-issue of the Magna Carta in 1225.
Also see http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/%7Epmcbride/james/s2.htm#I1313
m. Groecia (Grace) Bruere
(Grecia Briwere)

b.
d.
  William Marshall
the Protector,
Earl of Pembroke in right of his wife
b. 1146 or 1147
m. 1189 to Isabel (Eva) Clare
d. 14 May 1219
William Marshall was of the great baronial family of Marischal, marshal to the king. ... (Read More)
Also see this information.
m. Isabel (Eva) de Clare,
4th Countess of Pembroke
b. 1172
m. 1189 to William Marshall
d. 1220
Also see this information.
Isabel (Eva) de Clare had been under the guardianship of Henry II., who gave her in marriage in 1189. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Home Beers James    
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William de Braiose fell victim to the jealousy of Llewellyn, Prince of Wales, who suspecting an intimacy between him and the princess, his wife, King Henry's sister, invited him to an Easter feast, and treacherously cast him in prison at the conclusion of the banquet. He was soon afterwards put to death with the unfortunate princess, William being publicly hanged on May 2, 1230. Source: The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James and Wikipedia. William de Braiose (de Braose) of Abergavanny (also seen of Brecknock)
b. ca. 1197-1209
d. 2 May 1230
m. Eve Marshal
b. ca. 1200
d.
       
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descendants through daughter
Eva de Braiose
         






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